Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 08:11

Whose “Ethnic Cleansing?”: Israel’s Appropriation of the Palestinian Narrative

 
 
Palestinian ethnic cleansing
 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu recently claimed in a video posted on his Facebook page that the Palestinian demand to dismantle illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT) constitutes an act of “ethnic cleansing” against Israeli Jewish settlers. 1 The term, which was originally used as a euphemism during the Serbian campaign against Bosnians, soon came to describe extreme violent practices, mass killings, and forced displacement during conflict and war. It has also been used by many scholars as well as in public discourse to refer to Zionist practices against the Palestinian population in the lead-up to and during the Nakba of 1948. These practices include the destruction of more than 500 Palestinian villages and the expulsion of approximately 730,000 Palestinians from their homes.

Netanyahu’s application of the term to Israeli settlers garnered more than a million views on his Facebook page, and drew millions more via the video’s recirculation across social media platforms. It shocked many analysts, created a tense debate in the international media, and brought condemnation from the likes of then-UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, who called it “unacceptable and outrageous.” Yet such rhetoric, albeit more incendiary than usual, is but the latest instance of an Israeli strategy of appropriating a narrative of victimhood in order to shore up public support.
This commentary traces the history of the Israeli claim to this narrative from the early Zionist movement campaigns of the beginning of the twentieth century to the present day. It marks the ways in which such a rhetorical strategy has been used to justify the state of Israel’s actions to the detriment of Palestinians. It concludes with recommendations for how Palestinian leaders, intellectuals, journalists, and activists can counter the Israeli strategy of appropriation to further their quest for Palestinian self-determination and human rights.

Narratives of Victimhood in Context

In any conflict, actors resort to narratives of victimhood to justify aggression, invasion, and even the killing of civilians. Such rhetoric is intended to establish binary lines of good versus evil, victim versus perpetrator. This mobilizes supporters against “the enemy.” As we see with Israel and in other conflicts, narratives of victimhood serve to legitimize violent and often pre-emptive acts against “the enemy,” perpetuating the cycle of violence and victimhood indefinitely.

Israeli politicians use narratives that value Jewish victimhood over Palestinian lives and rights Click To Tweet

By contrast, Palestinian narratives of victimhood draw on the injustice enshrined in the Balfour Declaration of 1917 that began to be implemented before and during the British Mandate of 1923 and since the 1947 UN partition plan. These sentiments continue to this day, and are exacerbated by the international community’s, and the Arab world’s, unwillingness to enforce international law and basic human rights. Thus, Palestinians’ narrative of victimhood cannot be discussed outside of this context and continued Israeli political and military actions against Palestinians in the OPT. The situation includes an unequal power dynamic given that Israel is the mightier power and the occupier; a large number of Palestinian fatalities, including children, as a result of Israeli actions and attacks; and Israeli control of space and territories, as well as resources and movement.

Accordingly, while an analysis of how the history of Jewish persecution and victimhood was – and is – used to justify the actions of the state of Israel should never lose sight of the facts and context of that very real persecution, there is at the same time a need to scrutinize the mobilization of this narrative to understand how one group – Israeli Jews – have been granted victimhood, while another – Palestinians – have not, shoring up a power imbalance in which Jewish Israeli rights are favored at the expense of Palestinian rights.

From Victimhood to Ethnic Cleansing

Jewish persecution in Europe is rooted in anti-Semitism and the many ways in which it impacted Jewish communities in different locations and at different times. As for the narrative of persecution, it can be traced to the late nineteenth century, when Theodore Herzl, a father of Zionism, drew on the history of Jewish persecution in Europe to legitimize the nationalistic project of the Israeli state and its settler colonial practices. After WWII, this history of persecution was again invoked to justify the founding of the Israeli state. Indeed, Israel’s Declaration of Independence contends that

the Holocaust...in which millions of Jews in Europe were forced to slaughter again proved beyond doubt the compelling need to solve the problem of Jewish homelessness and dependence by the renewal of the Jewish state in the land of Israel, which would open wide the gates of the homeland to every Jew. 2

Since the creation of Israel, historical narratives that value Jewish victimhood over Palestinian lives and rights have been used time and again by Israeli politicians. Prime Minister Golda Meir commented, for instance, that Jews have a “Masada complex,” a “pogrom complex,” and a “Hitler complex,” and former Prime Minister Menachem Begin drew parallels between the Palestinians and the Nazis. 3

Scholarship suggests that Israeli and Zionist leaders manipulated the memory of Jewish persecution, particularly in relation to the Holocaust, as a diplomatic tool in their treatment of the Palestinians. For instance, the Israeli historian Ilan Pappe, in his book The Idea of Israel, argues that these leaders constructed a sense of Israelis as victims, a self-image that prevented them from seeing the Palestinian reality. This, he says, has impeded a political solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict. 4

In recent years, new evidence and studies have begun to question the dominant claims of the Zionist movement. At the same time the global solidarity movement in support of Palestinians has been growing, in part thanks to digital platforms that allow global audiences unmediated access to Palestinian stories and lived reality. This has spurred Israeli leaders, PR managers, spokespeople, and their media to focus on diverse strategies to maintain their hold on Western public opinion. 5

The misuse of the victimhood rhetoric can be used to label any criticism of Israel as anti-Semitic Click To Tweet

These include using a discourse – such as Netanyahu’s use of ethnic cleansing – to refer to Jews and Israeli citizens as victims of continued persecution by the Palestinians, with the knowledge that these terms have specific legal meanings and, according to international law, are considered to be crimes against humanity. But it is the terms’ associative and emotive meanings, particularly if they are intended to act as reminders of the long history of the persecution of the Jews, that serve to promote Jewish Israeli victimhood at the expense of Palestinians’ experiences of oppression. The term ethnic cleansing also has yet to be used officially in the West in regard to the Nakba, making it vulnerable to Israeli appropriation.

Around the same time as Netanyahu’s ethnic cleansing statement, the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs re-posted a related video on its Facebook page that had originally been released in 2013. The video, titled “Welcome to the Home of the Jewish People,” was billed as a short history of the Jews. It follows the travails of a Jewish couple, called Jacob and Rachel, when their home (the “Land of Israel”) is invaded by various groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Greeks, Arabs, Crusaders, the British Empire and – finally – the Palestinians. It thus proposes that Jews have survived a series of brutal invasions, with the only remaining invaders the Palestinians. The video provoked a strong reaction from Palestinian activists and those who work for Palestinian rights due to its clear attempt to rewrite the history of the conflict, framing of Israeli Jews as victims rather than the Palestinians, and deployment of racialized and violent language in its depiction of the Palestinians.

Netanyahu’s ethnic cleansing video is the latest in a series of videos planned and executed by David Keyes, Netanyahu's foreign media spokesman, who was appointed in March 2016. Keyes has been a key strategist behind an increase in pro-Israel marketing campaigns on social media. Since his appointment, eight videos with Netanyahu addressing a variety of issues have been posted. All have proved popular among his supporters in Israel and the US.

The arguments in Netanyahu’s statement draw on those proposed in a 2009 document for the Israel Project, a pro-Israel advocacy group, prepared by Frank Luntz, an American political consultant identified with the US Republican Party. 6 In this dictionary-cum- messaging-manual, Luntz details various tactics and terminology as well as tips for marketing and legitimizing discourses while also highlighting shared values with the West, such as “democracy,” “freedom,” and “security.”

With such a focus on the West, it is thus perhaps no surprise that Netanyahu communicates in English in the ethnic cleansing and other videos, with versions available with subtitles in Hebrew and Arabic.

Countering Israel’s Rhetorical Strategy

The history of Jewish persecution is a deeply affecting issue for Israelis and, more widely, for the international community, especially Europeans. However, the Israeli use of such terms as ethnic cleansing – at the hands of the Palestinians – wrongly depicts Israel as a victim and the Palestinians as an aggressor. Such rhetoric can be used in the dangerous practice of seeing any criticism of Israeli actions as anti-Semitic or as antagonistic toward Israel. This helps to stymie efforts on the part of Palestinians and Palestinian solidarity movements to hold Israel to account for its actions, such as extrajudicial killings and the illegal building of settlements in the OPT.

Given the fact that battles over narrative are becoming more prevalent and more visible in the digital age, and given the ways in which particular language may be used to deflect attention from on-the-ground developments, Netanyahu’s pointed use of the discourse of victimhood cannot be ignored. Attention to this development is all the more crucial at the current juncture, with Israel planning to expand settlements in and possibly annex further occupied territory, and with international determination and ability to resolve the conflict more sluggish than ever. Attention is also particularly necessary – and strategic – in a year marking the centenary of the Balfour Declaration, the five decades since the 1967 war, and the three decades since the first Palestinian intifada.

Israeli appropriation of the victimhood discourse demands a more effective Palestinian engagement Click To Tweet

The Israeli appropriation of the discourse around victimhood demands a more effective engagement by Palestinian spokespersons, political elites, and activists in the public sphere to expose the reality of Israeli actions and elicit international support for Palestine and the Palestinians. This does not mean taking part in a futile battle over who deserves to be called the real victim in the conflict, but to build a coordinated campaign to refute Israeli claims through evidence.

Such a campaign should contest Israeli narratives by using images and the language of international human rights that appeal to Western publics and leaders. It must always be based on evidence, facts, and context to counter attempts to misinform and disguise actions. The campaign should also train the Palestinian political elite and diplomatic staff in the use of political discourse directed to Palestinians, regionally and internationally, ensuring that the discourse does not legitimatize Zionist discourse by, for example, inadvertently using anti-Semitic tropes. Those Palestinians leading the campaign and international solidarity groups must use Twitter and other social media outlets to target the mainstream media with the real-life situation on the ground in the OPT, as well as facing the Palestinian citizens of Israel and the Palestinian refugees and exiles, using the language of rights and international law.

Finally, the campaign should engage media professionals to train Palestinians and advocacy groups on how to counter propagandistic narratives and statements, as well as how to use digital media to reach out to global audiences.

  1. with such concerted efforts can Israel’s strategy of appropriating the Palestinian narrative be contextualized and thus revealed as rhetoric intended to disguise the violence of Israeli settler colonialism.

Notes:

  1. The number of settlers is estimated at 600,000. See Ilan Pappe, The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine (Oxford, UK: Oneworld Publications, 2006). Also see Isabel Kershner, “Benjamin Netanyahu Draws Fire After Saying Palestinians Support ‘Ethnic Cleansing,’” New York Times, September 12, 2016.
  2. (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). The Pursuit of Peace and the Crisis of Israeli Identity: Defending/Defining the NationDov Waxman, Waxman, 49-56.
  3. (London: Verso, 2014). The Idea of Israel: A History of Power and KnowledgeIlan Pappe,
  4. Studies 13, 3 (Spring 1984): 27-48. Journal of Palestine “Zionism’s sense of ‘the world as supporter and audience’ that made the Zionist struggle for Palestine, one [that] was launched, supplied, and fueled in the great capitals of the West,” so successful – and that ensured, to a certain extent, the West’s compliance and collusion. Edward Said, “Permission to Narrate,” As Edward Said argued, it is
  5. 2009. The Israel Project’s Global Language Dictionary, Frank Luntz,
 
Dina Matar

 

Al-Shabaka Policy Member Dina Matar is senior lecturer in political communication at the Centre for Film and Media Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies. She works on the relationship between culture, communication and politics, with a special focus on Palestine, Lebanon and Syria. She is the author of “What it Means to be Palestinian: Stories of Palestinian Peoplehood” (Tauris, 2010); co-editor of “Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communication Practices in Palestine and Lebanon” (Taruis, 2013) and co-author of “The Hizbullah Phenomenon: Politics and Communication” (Hurst, 2014). Matar is also co-founding editor of the “The Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication.”

 
 

 

 
 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by Al-Shabaka.org - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 08:08
“ Le nettoyage ethnique de qui? ” : L’appropriation israélienne de l’histoire palestinienne
 
 
 
7 04 2017 • 18 h 55 min
 
 
 
 
 
 
image_pdfimage_print

 

Par Dina Matar, le 26 mars 2017

 

 

Le Premier Ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a récemment affirmé dans une vidéo postée sur sa page Facebook que la demande palestinienne de démanteler les colonies israéliennes illégales dans les Territoires palestiniens occupés (TPO) constituait un acte de « nettoyage ethnique » contre les colons juifs israéliens (1).

L’expression, utilisée originellement comme un euphémisme dans la campagne serbe contre la Bosnie, en est venue à décrire des pratiques d’une extrême violence, assassinats de masse, déplacements forcés pendant des conflits et des guerres. Elle a aussi été utilisée par de nombreux universitaires ainsi que dans les discours publics en référence aux pratiques sionistes contre la population palestinienne dans la phase précédant la Nakba et lors de la Nakba en 1948. Ces pratiques incluent la destruction de plus de 500 villages palestiniens et l’expulsion d’environ 730 000 Palestiniens de leur foyer.

L’application de cette expression aux colons israéliens faite par Netanyahu a été vue plus d’un million de fois sur sa page Facebook et a atteint des millions de personnes supplémentaires via la rediffusion de la vidéo sur les réseaux sociaux. Elle a choqué de nombreux analystes, créé un débat tendu dans les médias internationaux et reçu une condamnation de gens comme Ban Ki-Moon, alors secrétaire des Nations unies, qui l’a qualifiée d’ « inacceptable et de scandaleuse ». Pourtant ce genre de rhétorique, quoique plus incendiaire que d’habitude, n’est que la dernière instance d’une stratégie israélienne consistant à s’attribuer une histoire de victimes de manière à gagner des appuis publics.

Cet article retrace la chronique des revendications israéliennes à une telle histoire depuis les premières campagnes du mouvement sioniste au début du vingtième siècle jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Il indique les moyens par lesquels cette stratégie rhétorique a été utilisée pour justifier les actions de l’état d’Israël au détriment des Palestiniens. Il conclut avec des recommandations afin que les dirigeants palestiniens, les intellectuels, les journalistes, les militants puissent contrecarrer cette stratégie israélienne d’appropriation pour faire avancer leur quête pour l’autodétermination et les droits humains palestiniens.

Les récits de victimisation en contexte

Dans n’importe quel conflit, les acteurs ont recours à des discours de victimisation pour justifier l’agression, l’invasion et même le massacre de civils. Ce genre de rhétorique est destiné à établir une division binaire entre le bien et le mal, les victimes et les coupables. Elle mobilise les sympathisants contre « l’ennemi ». Comme nous le voyons avec Israël et dans d’autres conflits, ces discours de victimisation servent à légitimer des actes violents et souvent préventifs contre « l’ennemi », perpétuant indéfiniment le cycle de violence et de victimisation.

Par contraste, les discours palestiniens de victimisation puisent dans l’injustice inscrite dans la déclaration de Balfour de 1917 dont l’implémentation a commencé avant et pendant le mandat britannique de 1923 et depuis le plan de partition des Nations Unies de 1947. Ces sentiments continuent jusqu’à aujourd’hui et sont exacerbés par la réticence de la communauté internationale et du monde arabe à appliquer le droit international et les droits humains fondamentaux. Le discours palestinien de victimisation ne peut être discuté en dehors de ce contexte et des actions politiques et militaires israéliennes répétées contre des Palestiniens dans les TPO. La situation inclut : une dynamique des pouvoirs inégale dans laquelle Israël est la puissance la plus forte et l’occupant ; un grand nombre de morts palestiniens, y compris des enfants, résultant des actions et des attaques israéliennes ; et le contrôle israélien de l’espace et des territoires, ainsi que des ressources et des déplacements.

Par conséquent, alors qu’une analyse de la manière dont le récit des persécutions contre les Juifs et des victimes juives était — et est — utilisée pour justifier les actions de l’état d’Israël ne devrait jamais perdre de vue les faits et le contexte de cette persécution très réelle, il est en même temps nécessaire de scruter la façon dont ce récit est mobilisé pour comprendre comment on a accordé à un groupe — les Juifs israéliens— un statut de victime, et non à un autre — les Palestiniens—, alimentant un déséquilibre des pouvoirs dans lequel les droits des Juifs israéliens sont favorisés au dépens des droits palestiniens.

Du statut de victimes au nettoyage ethnique

La persécution des Juifs en Europe est enracinée dans l’antisémitisme et les manières multiples dont il a affecté les communautés juives à différents endroits et à différents moments. Quant au récit de cette persécution, on peut en remonter les traces jusqu’à la fin du dix-neuvième siècle lorsqu’un des pères du sionisme, Theodore Herzl, s’est appuyé sur l’histoire des persécutions juives en Europe pour légitimer le projet nationaliste de l’état d’Israël et ses pratiques coloniales. Après la deuxième guerre mondiale, l’histoire des persécutions a encore une fois été invoquée pour justifier la fondation de l’état d’Israël.

De fait, la Déclaration d’indépendance d’Israël maintient que « l’Holocauste… au cours duquel des millions de Juifs en Europe ont été conduits de force au massacre a prouvé sans aucun doute le besoin impérieux de résoudre le problème de l’itinérance et de la dépendance des Juifs en faisant renaître l’État juif sur les terres d’Israël, État qui ouvrirait toutes grandes les portes d’un foyer à chaque Juif ». (2)

Depuis la création d’Israël, les récits historiques mettant en valeur le statut de victimes des Juifs plus que les vies et les droits palestiniens ont été utilisés encore et encore par des politiciens israéliens. L’ancienne Première Ministre Golda Meir a remarqué par exemple que les Juifs ont « un complexe Masada », un « complexe des pogroms », et un « complexe de Hitler », et l’ancien Premier Ministre Menachem Begin a établi des parallèles entre les Palestiniens et les Nazis. (3)

Des travaux universitaires suggèrent que les dirigeants israéliens et sionistes ont manipulé la mémoire des persécutions juives, en particulier en lien avec l’Holocauste, comme un outil diplomatique dans leur traitement des Palestiniens. Par exemple, l’historien israélien Ilan Pappe, dans son livre The Idea of Israel, démontre que ces dirigeants ont construit une idée des Israéliens comme victimes, une auto-image qui les empêchent de voir la réalité palestinienne. Ceci, dit-il, a bloqué une solution politique au conflit israélo-arabe. (4)

Récemment, de nouveaux documents et de nouvelles études ont commencé à mettre en question les affirmations principales du mouvement sioniste. En même temps, le mouvement de solidarité globale de soutien aux Palestiniens s’est développé, en partie grâce aux plateformes numériques qui donnent à des audiences mondiales un accès direct aux récits palestiniens et à leur réalité vécue. Ceci a incité les dirigeants israéliens, les responsables des relations publiques, les porte-paroles et leurs médias à se focaliser sur diverses stratégies afin de maintenir leur emprise sur l’opinion publique occidentale. (5)

Ces stratégies incluent l’usage d’un discours —comme l’usage du nettoyage ethnique par Netanyahu– qui parle des Juifs et des citoyens israéliens comme des victimes de persécution continuelle par les Palestiniens, en toute connaissance que ces termes ont des sens légaux spécifiques et que, selon le droit international, ils sont considérés comme des crimes contre l’humanité. Mais ce sont les sens associatifs et émotionnels des termes, en particulier s’ils agissent comme des rappels de la longue histoire de persécution des Juifs, qui servent à promouvoir la victimisation juive israélienne au détriment des expériences d’oppression palestiniennes. L’expression « nettoyage ethnique » n’est toujours pas utilisée officiellement en Occident par rapport à la Nakba, ce qui la rend vulnérable à l’appropriation israélienne.

A peu près en même temps que la déclaration de Netanyahu sur le nettoyage ethnique, le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères re-postait sur sa page Facebook une vidéo associée qui avait été à l’origine postée en 2013. Cette vidéo, intitulée « Bienvenue au pays du peuple juif », se présentait comme une histoire succincte des Juifs. Elle suivait les malheurs d’un couple juif, appelé Jacob et Rachel, lorsque le pays subissait l’invasion de différents groupes, les Assyriens, les Babyloniens, les Grecs, les Arabes, les Croisés, l’Empire britannique et —enfin— les Palestiniens.

Ceci suggèrait donc que les Juifs avaient survécu à une série d’invasions brutales, les seuls envahisseurs restants étant les Palestiniens. La vidéo a provoqué une vive réaction des militants palestiniens et de ceux travaillant pour les droits palestiniens à cause de sa tentative évidente de réécrire l’histoire du conflit, en construisant les juifs israéliens comme des victimes plutôt que les Palestiniens et à cause du déploiement d’un langage violent et racial pour peindre les Palestiniens.

La vidéo du nettoyage ethnique de Netanyahu est la dernière d’une série de vidéos planifiées et exécutées par David Keyes, le porte-parole dans les médias étrangers de Netanyahu, qui a été nommé en mars 2016. Keyes a été un stratège clé derrière l’accroissement des campagnes de marketing pro-israéliennes sur les réseaux sociaux. Depuis sa nomination, huit vidéos avec Netanyahu discutant une variété de questions ont été postées en ligne. Toutes ont été populaires parmi ses sympathisants en Israël et aux États-Unis.

 

Les arguments dans la déclaration de Netanyahu s’appuient sur ceux proposés dans un document de 2009 pour le Projet Israël, un groupe de défense pro-israélien, préparé par Frank Luntz, un consultant politique américain associé avec le Parti Républicain américain 6. Dans son manuel-dictionnaire-avec un message, Luntz détaille diverses tactiques et terminologies ainsi que des astuces pour vendre et légitimer des discours, en insistant sur des valeurs partagées avec l’Occident comme « démocratie », « liberté » et « sécurité ». Avec une telle focalisation sur l’Occident, il n’est peut-être pas surprenant que Netanyahu communique en anglais sur le nettoyage ethnique ou dans d’autres vidéos, avec des versions disponibles en hébreu et en arabe.

Stratégie rhétorique

L’histoire de la persécution des Juifs est une question profondément douloureuse pour les Israéliens et plus largement pour la communauté internationale, en particulier les Européens. Pourtant, l’utilisation israélienne d’expressions comme « nettoyage ethnique » —comme pratiqué par les Palestiniens— dépeint à tort Israël comme une victime et les Palestiniens comme un agresseur. Une telle rhétorique peut être utilisée dans la pratique dangereuse de voir toute critique des actions d’Israël comme antisémite ou comme hostile à Israël. Ceci aide à entraver les efforts de la part des Palestiniens et des mouvements de solidarité envers la Palestine pour obtenir qu’Israël rende des comptes sur ses actions, comme les exécutions sans jugement et la construction illégale de colonies dans les TPO. Étant donné que les luttes autour des narratifs historiques sont devenus plus importants et plus visibles à l’ère digitale et étant donnés les moyens par lesquels des éléments de langages particuliers peuvent être utilisés pour détourner l’attention des développements sur le terrain, l’usage affuté du discours de la victimisation par Netanyahu ne peut être ignoré.

L’attention à ce développement est encore plus cruciale au stade actuel, avec le plan d’Israël d’étendre les colonies et peut-être d’annexer de nouveaux territoires occupés, et alors que la détermination et la capacité internationales à résoudre le conflit sont plus molles que jamais. L’attention est aussi particulièrement nécessaire — et stratégique — dans l’année qui marque le centenaire de la déclaration de Balfour, le cinquantenaire de la guerre de 1967 et les trente ans écoulés depuis la première intifada palestinienne.

L’appropriation par Israël du discours de victimisation demande un engagement plus efficace par les porte-paroles palestiniens, les élites politiques et les militants de la sphère publique pour exposer la réalité des actions israéliennes et provoquer un soutien international en faveur de la Palestine et des Palestiniens. Cela ne signifie pas prendre part à une bataille futile sur la question de savoir qui mérite d’être appelée la vraie victime du conflit, mais construire une campagne coordonnée pour réfuter les affirmations israéliennes avec des preuves.

Une telle campagne devrait contester les récits israéliens en utilisant les images et le langage des droits humains internationaux, qui ont un attrait pour les publics et les dirigeants occidentaux. Elle doit toujours être basée sur des preuves, des faits et leur contexte, afin de contrer les tentatives pour désinformer et déguiser les actions. La campagne devrait aussi entrainer l’élite politique palestinienne et le personnel diplomatique à l’usage de discours politiques dirigés vers les Palestiniens, régionalement et internationalement, pour s’assurer que le discours ne légitimise pas le récit sioniste, par exemple, en utilisant par inadvertance des tropes antisémites.

Les Palestiniens dirigeant la campagne et les groupes de solidarité internationaux doivent utiliser Twitter et les autres organes de réseaux sociaux pour cibler les principaux médias et les informer de la situation concrète sur le terrain dans les TPO, et affronter la question des citoyens palestiniens d’Israël et des réfugiés et exilés palestiniens, en utilisant le langage du droit international.

Enfin, la campagne devrait engager des professionnels des médias pour entraîner des Palestiniens et des groupes de défense sur la façon de contrer des récits et des déclarations propagandistes ainsi que sur celle d’utiliser les médias numériques pour atteindre des audiences globales.

C’est seulement par de tels efforts concertés que la stratégie d’Israël de s’approprier le discours palestinien pourra être mise en contexte et ainsi révélée comme une pure rhétorique destinée à déguiser la violence du colonialisme israélien.

Notes:

1 Le nombre de colons est estimé à 600 000. Voir Ilan Pappe, The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine (Oxford, UK: Oneworld Publications, 2006). Voir aussi Isabel Kershner, “Benjamin Netanyahu Draws Fire After Saying Palestinians Support ‘Ethnic Cleansing,’” New York Times, 12 septembre 2016.

2 Dov Waxman, The Pursuit of Peace and the Crisis of Israeli Identity: Defending/Defining the Nation (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

3 Waxman, 49-56.

4 Ilan Pappe, The Idea of Israel: A History of Power and Knowledge (London: Verso, 2014).

5 Comme l’a dit Edward Said, c’est le « sens du sionisme pour ‘le monde comme sympathisant et comme audience’ qui a rendu le combat sioniste pour la Palestine, un combat lancé, approvisionné, et alimenté dans les grandes capitales de l’Occident », si efficace – et qui a assuré l’acquiescement et la connivence de l’Occident. Edward Said, « Permission to Narrate », Journal of Palestine Studies 13, 3 (Spring 1984): 27-48.

6 Frank Luntz, The Israel Project’s Global Language Dictionary, 2009.

Dina Matar

Membre d’Al-Shabaka, Dina Matar est senior lecturer en communication politique au Centre d’études sur le film et les médias à l’École des études orientales et africaines (School of Oriental and African Studies). Elle travaille sur la relation entre la culture, la communication et la politique, avec une attention particulière aux cas de la Palestine, du Liban et de la Syrie. Elle est l’auteure de “What it Means to be Palestinian: Stories of Palestinian Peoplehood” (Tauris, 2010); co-éditrice de “Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communication Practices in Palestine and Lebanon” (Taruis, 2013) et co-auteure de “The Hizbullah Phenomenon: Politics and Communication” (Hurst, 2014). Matar est aussi co-éditrice fondatrice de “The Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication.”

Traduit par Catherine G. Pour l’Agence Media Palestine

Source : Al Shabaka

 

Lien pour accéder à l'article original : https://al-shabaka.org/commentaries/whose-ethnic-cleansing-israels-appropriation-palestinian-narrative/

 

http://www.agencemediapalestine.fr/blog/2017/04/07/le-nettoyage-ethnique-de-qui-lappropriation-israelienne-de-lhistoire-palestinienne/

Repost 0
Published by Al Shabaka.org (Palestine) / Agence Media Palestine - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 08:06

On 69th anniversary, PLO remembers 'heartbreaking' Deir Yassin massacre

April 9, 2017 9:50 P.M. (Updated: April 9, 2017 9:51 P.M.)
 
 
Archive photo of survivors of the Deir Yassin massacre. (File)

 

 

BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) -- The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) marked on Sunday the 69th anniversary of the Deir Yassin massacre, when at least 100 Palestinians were killed by Zionist militias in the Jerusalem-area village of Deir Yassin in 1948.

PLO Executive Committee member Hanan Ashrawi mourned the “heartbreaking tragedy” in which “more than one hundred innocent men, women and children...were brutally murdered by armed members of Zionist terrorist organizations.”

Deir Yassin has long been a symbol of Israeli violence for Palestinians because of the particularly gruesome nature of the slaughter, which targeted men, women, children, and the elderly in the small village west of Jerusalem.

The number of victims is generally believed to be around 107, though figures given at the time reached up to 254, out of a village that numbered around 600 at the time.

The massacre left more than 50 young children orphaned, Ashrawi noted, adding that the deadly attack was part of a broader plan in 1948 to expulse Palestinians from their homes “with the deliberate intent of establishing the State of Israel on Palestinian soil.”

“After sixty-nine years, the Deir Yassin massacre still remains an important reminder of Israel’s systematic measures of displacement, destruction, dispossession, and dehumanization,” Ashrawi said. “The calculated efforts by Israel to completely erase the history, narrative and physical presence of the Palestinian people will not be ignored or forgotten. It is time for Israel’s lethal impunity to come to an end.”

“We urge all members of the international community to hold Israel to account immediately, to curb its ongoing violations against the Palestinians, and to support our nonviolent and diplomatic efforts to seek justice and protection in all international legal venues," she added.

The Deir Yassin massacre was led by the Irgun militia, whose head was future Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, with support from other paramilitary groups Haganah and Lehi whose primary aim was to push Palestinians out through force.

Records of the massacre describe Palestinian homes blown up with residents inside, and families shot down as they attempted to flee.

The massacre came in spite of Deir Yassin resident's efforts to maintain positive relations with new Jewish neighbors, including the signing of pact that was approved by Haganah, a main Zionist paramilitary organization during the British Mandate of Palestine.

The massacre was one of the first in what would become a long line of attacks on countless Palestinian villages, part of a broader strategy called Plan Dalet by Zionist groups aiming to strike fear into local Palestinians in hopes that the ensuing terror would lead to an Arab exodus, to ensure only Jews were left in what would become modern-day Israel.

The attack on Deir Yassin took place a month before the UN Partition Plan was expected to be carried out, and was part of reasons later given by neighboring Arab states for their intervention in Palestine.

The combination of forced expulsion and flight that the massacres -- what would later become known among Palestinians as the Nakba, or catastrophe -- led around 750,000 Palestinians to become refugees abroad. Today their descendants number more than five million, and their right of return remains a central political demand.

The anniversary of the deadly razing of the village comes as modern day Palestinians in occupied East Jerusalem and the West Bank continue to face widespread illegal settlement expansion, home demolitions, detention campaigns, and extrajudicial executions at the hands of Israeli forces.

 
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 07:59
Publish Date: 2017/04/09
Israeli forces shut down workshop, ransack home in Hebron
 
 
 

HEBRON, April 9, 2017 (WAFA) – Israeli forces Monday shut down a metal workshop in the town of al-Shuyukh, east of the district of Hebron, in the occupied West Bank, security sources said.

The sources told WAFA that Israeli forces raided the town of al-Shuyukh and closed a metal workshop, which belongs to local resident Ayyoub al-Karaki, after claiming that it is used to manufacture weapons.

Meanwhile, Israeli soldiers raided the town of Sa’ir, nearby, and raided a local Palestinian's house and vandalized its furniture.

K.T/M.N

 

 

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=TiiuDqa73470572835aTiiuDq

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 07:31

Palestinians in Silwan defend their homes from ongoing settler excavations

 
 
April 10, 2017 1:55 P.M. (Updated: April 10, 2017 6:36 P.M.)
 
 
JERUSALEM (Ma'an) -- After Israel ordered the evacuation of three homes in occupied East Jerusalem due to severe structural damage caused by settler-led tunnel construction below, Palestinian residents say they refuse to leave, and accuse Israel of indirectly attempting to expel them the city, where Israel has openly called for a maintaining Jewish majority.

The homes are located in the Wadi Hilweh area of Silwan, a Palestinian neighborhood just south of the Old City walls, where Israel frequently allows excavations and archaeological digs that threaten the structural integrity of Palestinian homes and holy sites in the area.

Rights groups claim that these excavations often seek to promote Jewish heritage and attachment to the occupied city, while erasing Palestinian history, in order to promote claims of Jewish ownership and further displace Palestinians, particularly those living in neighborhoods around the Old City.

Last October, UNESCO denounced Israel for failing to put an end to the practice.

 

 

 

 

Israel’s Jerusalem municipality issued the evacuation orders to Hamed Oweida, Abed Oweida, and Suleiman Oweida on Wednesday evening, due to fractures and cracks formed at the base of their houses, where 16 people, including ten children, live.

Family members said that after calling Israeli police to report that their houses were shaking from loud tunnel digging below, a municipality inspection team arrived and ordered the families to evacuate the homes immediately due to them being at risk of imminent collapse.

Palestinian residents in Wadi Hilweh have long reported sounds of underground digging and the resultant cracks appearing on the walls of their aging homes, but the Oweidas said that the “life-threatening” damages in their homes seen in recent weeks were “more severe than ever before.”

However, Khadija Oweida affirmed to Ma’an that her family would not leave.

"We have been living in these houses for decades despite cracks in the foundations and despite the risks," she said. While the municipality says the buildings have become too dangerous to inhabit, Oweida explained that if the families abandoned the houses, they also ceded control over what happened to them.

Settler groups, such as the Elad organization, have long been trying to take over any house in the area by any means, she argued.

 
 
 

 

"We hear sounds under our houses around the clock from manual tools as well as heavy machinery. We see large amounts of earth being taken out from under our houses, which are clearly causing these cracks."

Rather than force them out of their homes, Oweida demanded that Israeli authorities simply put a stop to the excavations.

However, in response to a request for comment after the evacuation was ordered on Wednesday, a spokesperson from the Jerusalem municipality told Ma'an that "claims that the city is attempting to construct underneath this family's structure are patently false."

 

 

 

 

Khadija said that excavations under the three houses started about four years ago, while the Wadi Hilweh neighborhood committee said that Israeli authorities began work under the neighborhood at large in 2007.

Another resident of the neighborhood, Wafaa Bamya, told Ma’an that her family couldn’t sleep at night because of constant digging, shaking, and lighting caused by the excavation work. “All of a sudden, new cracks appear on the walls, and old cracks become wider and wider,” she said.

"This is an indirect attempt to expel us from our homes,” she charged. “In spite of the threat caused by the digging, we are going to stay here because it is the only place we truly feel safe."

Nihad Siyam, who works at the Silwan-based watchdog the Wadi Hilweh Information Center, affirmed that the cracks started to appear in houses long ago. After the excavations were first noticed in 2007, residents appealed to an Israeli court that ordered to put a halt to construction under their homes for 14 months.

 

 

However, he said that settler organizations submitted their own appeal to the decision, and obtained a court order allowing the groups to continue "searching for their history and heritage,” on the condition that the digging not endanger the lives of residents.

Israeli authorities have claimed, according to Siyam, that the excavations “are based on engineering standards to ensure the safety of neighborhood.”

Siyam said that the cracks and collapses sections in walls, rooftops, and floors in numerous homes in the area are proof of the contrary.

Meanwhile, according to experts, archaeologists abandoned the practice of digging horizontal tunnels as long as a century ago, as it is considered professionally unethical and actually leads to the destruction of antiquities.

Ahmad Qarain, a member of a local committee representing Wadi Hilweh families, said that their lawyer Sami Rashid was set to appeal to Israeli courts again to put an end to the excavations.

More than 50 houses, he said, have suffered to varying degrees as a result of the ongoing construction.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
11 avril 2017 2 11 /04 /avril /2017 07:24

Palestinians in Silwan defend their homes from ongoing settler excavations

 
 
April 10, 2017 1:55 P.M. (Updated: April 10, 2017 6:36 P.M.)
 
 
JERUSALEM (Ma'an) -- After Israel ordered the evacuation of three homes in occupied East Jerusalem due to severe structural damage caused by settler-led tunnel construction below, Palestinian residents say they refuse to leave, and accuse Israel of indirectly attempting to expel them the city, where Israel has openly called for a maintaining Jewish majority.

 

The homes are located in the Wadi Hilweh area of Silwan, a Palestinian neighborhood just south of the Old City walls, where Israel frequently allows excavations and archaeological digs that threaten the structural integrity of Palestinian homes and holy sites in the area.

 

Rights groups claim that these excavations often seek to promote Jewish heritage and attachment to the occupied city, while erasing Palestinian history, in order to promote claims of Jewish ownership and further displace Palestinians, particularly those living in neighborhoods around the Old City.

 

Last October, UNESCO denounced Israel for failing to put an end to the practice.
 

 

Israel’s Jerusalem municipality issued the evacuation orders to Hamed Oweida, Abed Oweida, and Suleiman Oweida on Wednesday evening, due to fractures and cracks formed at the base of their houses, where 16 people, including ten children, live.

 

Family members said that after calling Israeli police to report that their houses were shaking from loud tunnel digging below, a municipality inspection team arrived and ordered the families to evacuate the homes immediately due to them being at risk of imminent collapse.

 

Palestinian residents in Wadi Hilweh have long reported sounds of underground digging and the resultant cracks appearing on the walls of their aging homes, but the Oweidas said that the “life-threatening” damages in their homes seen in recent weeks were “more severe than ever before.”

 

However, Khadija Oweida affirmed to Ma’an that her family would not leave.

 

"We have been living in these houses for decades despite cracks in the foundations and despite the risks," she said. While the municipality says the buildings have become too dangerous to inhabit, Oweida explained that if the families abandoned the houses, they also ceded control over what happened to them.

 

Settler groups, such as the Elad organization, have long been trying to take over any house in the area by any means, she argued.
 

 

"We hear sounds under our houses around the clock from manual tools as well as heavy machinery. We see large amounts of earth being taken out from under our houses, which are clearly causing these cracks."

 

Rather than force them out of their homes, Oweida demanded that Israeli authorities simply put a stop to the excavations.

 

However, in response to a request for comment after the evacuation was ordered on Wednesday, a spokesperson from the Jerusalem municipality told Ma'an that "claims that the city is attempting to construct underneath this family's structure are patently false."
 

 

Khadija said that excavations under the three houses started about four years ago, while the Wadi Hilweh neighborhood committee said that Israeli authorities began work under the neighborhood at large in 2007.

 

Another resident of the neighborhood, Wafaa Bamya, told Ma’an that her family couldn’t sleep at night because of constant digging, shaking, and lighting caused by the excavation work. “All of a sudden, new cracks appear on the walls, and old cracks become wider and wider,” she said.

 

"This is an indirect attempt to expel us from our homes,” she charged. “In spite of the threat caused by the digging, we are going to stay here because it is the only place we truly feel safe."

 

Nihad Siyam, who works at the Silwan-based watchdog the Wadi Hilweh Information Center, affirmed that the cracks started to appear in houses long ago. After the excavations were first noticed in 2007, residents appealed to an Israeli court that ordered to put a halt to construction under their homes for 14 months.
 

 

However, he said that settler organizations submitted their own appeal to the decision, and obtained a court order allowing the groups to continue "searching for their history and heritage,” on the condition that the digging not endanger the lives of residents.

 

Israeli authorities have claimed, according to Siyam, that the excavations “are based on engineering standards to ensure the safety of neighborhood.”

 

Siyam said that the cracks and collapses sections in walls, rooftops, and floors in numerous homes in the area are proof of the contrary.

 

Meanwhile, according to experts, archaeologists abandoned the practice of digging horizontal tunnels as long as a century ago, as it is considered professionally unethical and actually leads to the destruction of antiquities.

 

Ahmad Qarain, a member of a local committee representing Wadi Hilweh families, said that their lawyer Sami Rashid was set to appeal to Israeli courts again to put an end to the excavations.

 

More than 50 houses, he said, have suffered to varying degrees as a result of the ongoing construction.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
9 avril 2017 7 09 /04 /avril /2017 22:42
“ Le nettoyage ethnique de qui? ” : L’appropriation israélienne de l’histoire palestinienne
 
 
 
7 04 2017 • 18 h 55 min
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Par Dina Matar, le 26 mars 2017

 

 

Le Premier Ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a récemment affirmé dans une vidéo postée sur sa page Facebook que la demande palestinienne de démanteler les colonies israéliennes illégales dans les Territoires palestiniens occupés (TPO) constituait un acte de « nettoyage ethnique » contre les colons juifs israéliens (1).

L’expression, utilisée originellement comme un euphémisme dans la campagne serbe contre la Bosnie, en est venue à décrire des pratiques d’une extrême violence, assassinats de masse, déplacements forcés pendant des conflits et des guerres. Elle a aussi été utilisée par de nombreux universitaires ainsi que dans les discours publics en référence aux pratiques sionistes contre la population palestinienne dans la phase précédant la Nakba et lors de la Nakba en 1948. Ces pratiques incluent la destruction de plus de 500 villages palestiniens et l’expulsion d’environ 730 000 Palestiniens de leur foyer.

L’application de cette expression aux colons israéliens faite par Netanyahu a été vue plus d’un million de fois sur sa page Facebook et a atteint des millions de personnes supplémentaires via la rediffusion de la vidéo sur les réseaux sociaux. Elle a choqué de nombreux analystes, créé un débat tendu dans les médias internationaux et reçu une condamnation de gens comme Ban Ki-Moon, alors secrétaire des Nations unies, qui l’a qualifiée d’ « inacceptable et de scandaleuse ». Pourtant ce genre de rhétorique, quoique plus incendiaire que d’habitude, n’est que la dernière instance d’une stratégie israélienne consistant à s’attribuer une histoire de victimes de manière à gagner des appuis publics.

Cet article retrace la chronique des revendications israéliennes à une telle histoire depuis les premières campagnes du mouvement sioniste au début du vingtième siècle jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Il indique les moyens par lesquels cette stratégie rhétorique a été utilisée pour justifier les actions de l’état d’Israël au détriment des Palestiniens. Il conclut avec des recommandations afin que les dirigeants palestiniens, les intellectuels, les journalistes, les militants puissent contrecarrer cette stratégie israélienne d’appropriation pour faire avancer leur quête pour l’autodétermination et les droits humains palestiniens.

Les récits de victimisation en contexte

Dans n’importe quel conflit, les acteurs ont recours à des discours de victimisation pour justifier l’agression, l’invasion et même le massacre de civils. Ce genre de rhétorique est destiné à établir une division binaire entre le bien et le mal, les victimes et les coupables. Elle mobilise les sympathisants contre « l’ennemi ». Comme nous le voyons avec Israël et dans d’autres conflits, ces discours de victimisation servent à légitimer des actes violents et souvent préventifs contre « l’ennemi », perpétuant indéfiniment le cycle de violence et de victimisation.

Par contraste, les discours palestiniens de victimisation puisent dans l’injustice inscrite dans la déclaration de Balfour de 1917 dont l’implémentation a commencé avant et pendant le mandat britannique de 1923 et depuis le plan de partition des Nations Unies de 1947. Ces sentiments continuent jusqu’à aujourd’hui et sont exacerbés par la réticence de la communauté internationale et du monde arabe à appliquer le droit international et les droits humains fondamentaux. Le discours palestinien de victimisation ne peut être discuté en dehors de ce contexte et des actions politiques et militaires israéliennes répétées contre des Palestiniens dans les TPO. La situation inclut : une dynamique des pouvoirs inégale dans laquelle Israël est la puissance la plus forte et l’occupant ; un grand nombre de morts palestiniens, y compris des enfants, résultant des actions et des attaques israéliennes ; et le contrôle israélien de l’espace et des territoires, ainsi que des ressources et des déplacements.

Par conséquent, alors qu’une analyse de la manière dont le récit des persécutions contre les Juifs et des victimes juives était — et est — utilisée pour justifier les actions de l’état d’Israël ne devrait jamais perdre de vue les faits et le contexte de cette persécution très réelle, il est en même temps nécessaire de scruter la façon dont ce récit est mobilisé pour comprendre comment on a accordé à un groupe — les Juifs israéliens— un statut de victime, et non à un autre — les Palestiniens—, alimentant un déséquilibre des pouvoirs dans lequel les droits des Juifs israéliens sont favorisés au dépens des droits palestiniens.

Du statut de victimes au nettoyage ethnique

La persécution des Juifs en Europe est enracinée dans l’antisémitisme et les manières multiples dont il a affecté les communautés juives à différents endroits et à différents moments. Quant au récit de cette persécution, on peut en remonter les traces jusqu’à la fin du dix-neuvième siècle lorsqu’un des pères du sionisme, Theodore Herzl, s’est appuyé sur l’histoire des persécutions juives en Europe pour légitimer le projet nationaliste de l’état d’Israël et ses pratiques coloniales. Après la deuxième guerre mondiale, l’histoire des persécutions a encore une fois été invoquée pour justifier la fondation de l’état d’Israël.

De fait, la Déclaration d’indépendance d’Israël maintient que « l’Holocauste… au cours duquel des millions de Juifs en Europe ont été conduits de force au massacre a prouvé sans aucun doute le besoin impérieux de résoudre le problème de l’itinérance et de la dépendance des Juifs en faisant renaître l’État juif sur les terres d’Israël, État qui ouvrirait toutes grandes les portes d’un foyer à chaque Juif ». (2)

Depuis la création d’Israël, les récits historiques mettant en valeur le statut de victimes des Juifs plus que les vies et les droits palestiniens ont été utilisés encore et encore par des politiciens israéliens. L’ancienne Première Ministre Golda Meir a remarqué par exemple que les Juifs ont « un complexe Masada », un « complexe des pogroms », et un « complexe de Hitler », et l’ancien Premier Ministre Menachem Begin a établi des parallèles entre les Palestiniens et les Nazis. (3)

Des travaux universitaires suggèrent que les dirigeants israéliens et sionistes ont manipulé la mémoire des persécutions juives, en particulier en lien avec l’Holocauste, comme un outil diplomatique dans leur traitement des Palestiniens. Par exemple, l’historien israélien Ilan Pappe, dans son livre The Idea of Israel, démontre que ces dirigeants ont construit une idée des Israéliens comme victimes, une auto-image qui les empêchent de voir la réalité palestinienne. Ceci, dit-il, a bloqué une solution politique au conflit israélo-arabe. (4)

Récemment, de nouveaux documents et de nouvelles études ont commencé à mettre en question les affirmations principales du mouvement sioniste. En même temps, le mouvement de solidarité globale de soutien aux Palestiniens s’est développé, en partie grâce aux plateformes numériques qui donnent à des audiences mondiales un accès direct aux récits palestiniens et à leur réalité vécue. Ceci a incité les dirigeants israéliens, les responsables des relations publiques, les porte-paroles et leurs médias à se focaliser sur diverses stratégies afin de maintenir leur emprise sur l’opinion publique occidentale. (5)

Ces stratégies incluent l’usage d’un discours —comme l’usage du nettoyage ethnique par Netanyahu– qui parle des Juifs et des citoyens israéliens comme des victimes de persécution continuelle par les Palestiniens, en toute connaissance que ces termes ont des sens légaux spécifiques et que, selon le droit international, ils sont considérés comme des crimes contre l’humanité. Mais ce sont les sens associatifs et émotionnels des termes, en particulier s’ils agissent comme des rappels de la longue histoire de persécution des Juifs, qui servent à promouvoir la victimisation juive israélienne au détriment des expériences d’oppression palestiniennes. L’expression « nettoyage ethnique » n’est toujours pas utilisée officiellement en Occident par rapport à la Nakba, ce qui la rend vulnérable à l’appropriation israélienne.

A peu près en même temps que la déclaration de Netanyahu sur le nettoyage ethnique, le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères re-postait sur sa page Facebook une vidéo associée qui avait été à l’origine postée en 2013. Cette vidéo, intitulée « Bienvenue au pays du peuple juif », se présentait comme une histoire succincte des Juifs. Elle suivait les malheurs d’un couple juif, appelé Jacob et Rachel, lorsque le pays subissait l’invasion de différents groupes, les Assyriens, les Babyloniens, les Grecs, les Arabes, les Croisés, l’Empire britannique et —enfin— les Palestiniens.

Ceci suggèrait donc que les Juifs avaient survécu à une série d’invasions brutales, les seuls envahisseurs restants étant les Palestiniens. La vidéo a provoqué une vive réaction des militants palestiniens et de ceux travaillant pour les droits palestiniens à cause de sa tentative évidente de réécrire l’histoire du conflit, en construisant les juifs israéliens comme des victimes plutôt que les Palestiniens et à cause du déploiement d’un langage violent et racial pour peindre les Palestiniens.

La vidéo du nettoyage ethnique de Netanyahu est la dernière d’une série de vidéos planifiées et exécutées par David Keyes, le porte-parole dans les médias étrangers de Netanyahu, qui a été nommé en mars 2016. Keyes a été un stratège clé derrière l’accroissement des campagnes de marketing pro-israéliennes sur les réseaux sociaux. Depuis sa nomination, huit vidéos avec Netanyahu discutant une variété de questions ont été postées en ligne. Toutes ont été populaires parmi ses sympathisants en Israël et aux États-Unis.

 

Les arguments dans la déclaration de Netanyahu s’appuient sur ceux proposés dans un document de 2009 pour le Projet Israël, un groupe de défense pro-israélien, préparé par Frank Luntz, un consultant politique américain associé avec le Parti Républicain américain 6. Dans son manuel-dictionnaire-avec un message, Luntz détaille diverses tactiques et terminologies ainsi que des astuces pour vendre et légitimer des discours, en insistant sur des valeurs partagées avec l’Occident comme « démocratie », « liberté » et « sécurité ». Avec une telle focalisation sur l’Occident, il n’est peut-être pas surprenant que Netanyahu communique en anglais sur le nettoyage ethnique ou dans d’autres vidéos, avec des versions disponibles en hébreu et en arabe.

Stratégie rhétorique

L’histoire de la persécution des Juifs est une question profondément douloureuse pour les Israéliens et plus largement pour la communauté internationale, en particulier les Européens. Pourtant, l’utilisation israélienne d’expressions comme « nettoyage ethnique » —comme pratiqué par les Palestiniens— dépeint à tort Israël comme une victime et les Palestiniens comme un agresseur. Une telle rhétorique peut être utilisée dans la pratique dangereuse de voir toute critique des actions d’Israël comme antisémite ou comme hostile à Israël. Ceci aide à entraver les efforts de la part des Palestiniens et des mouvements de solidarité envers la Palestine pour obtenir qu’Israël rende des comptes sur ses actions, comme les exécutions sans jugement et la construction illégale de colonies dans les TPO. Étant donné que les luttes autour des narratifs historiques sont devenus plus importants et plus visibles à l’ère digitale et étant donnés les moyens par lesquels des éléments de langages particuliers peuvent être utilisés pour détourner l’attention des développements sur le terrain, l’usage affuté du discours de la victimisation par Netanyahu ne peut être ignoré.

L’attention à ce développement est encore plus cruciale au stade actuel, avec le plan d’Israël d’étendre les colonies et peut-être d’annexer de nouveaux territoires occupés, et alors que la détermination et la capacité internationales à résoudre le conflit sont plus molles que jamais. L’attention est aussi particulièrement nécessaire — et stratégique — dans l’année qui marque le centenaire de la déclaration de Balfour, le cinquantenaire de la guerre de 1967 et les trente ans écoulés depuis la première intifada palestinienne.

L’appropriation par Israël du discours de victimisation demande un engagement plus efficace par les porte-paroles palestiniens, les élites politiques et les militants de la sphère publique pour exposer la réalité des actions israéliennes et provoquer un soutien international en faveur de la Palestine et des Palestiniens. Cela ne signifie pas prendre part à une bataille futile sur la question de savoir qui mérite d’être appelée la vraie victime du conflit, mais construire une campagne coordonnée pour réfuter les affirmations israéliennes avec des preuves.

Une telle campagne devrait contester les récits israéliens en utilisant les images et le langage des droits humains internationaux, qui ont un attrait pour les publics et les dirigeants occidentaux. Elle doit toujours être basée sur des preuves, des faits et leur contexte, afin de contrer les tentatives pour désinformer et déguiser les actions. La campagne devrait aussi entrainer l’élite politique palestinienne et le personnel diplomatique à l’usage de discours politiques dirigés vers les Palestiniens, régionalement et internationalement, pour s’assurer que le discours ne légitimise pas le récit sioniste, par exemple, en utilisant par inadvertance des tropes antisémites.

Les Palestiniens dirigeant la campagne et les groupes de solidarité internationaux doivent utiliser Twitter et les autres organes de réseaux sociaux pour cibler les principaux médias et les informer de la situation concrète sur le terrain dans les TPO, et affronter la question des citoyens palestiniens d’Israël et des réfugiés et exilés palestiniens, en utilisant le langage du droit international.

Enfin, la campagne devrait engager des professionnels des médias pour entraîner des Palestiniens et des groupes de défense sur la façon de contrer des récits et des déclarations propagandistes ainsi que sur celle d’utiliser les médias numériques pour atteindre des audiences globales.

C’est seulement par de tels efforts concertés que la stratégie d’Israël de s’approprier le discours palestinien pourra être mise en contexte et ainsi révélée comme une pure rhétorique destinée à déguiser la violence du colonialisme israélien.

Notes:

1 Le nombre de colons est estimé à 600 000. Voir Ilan Pappe, The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine (Oxford, UK: Oneworld Publications, 2006). Voir aussi Isabel Kershner, “Benjamin Netanyahu Draws Fire After Saying Palestinians Support ‘Ethnic Cleansing,’” New York Times, 12 septembre 2016.

2 Dov Waxman, The Pursuit of Peace and the Crisis of Israeli Identity: Defending/Defining the Nation (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

3 Waxman, 49-56.

4 Ilan Pappe, The Idea of Israel: A History of Power and Knowledge (London: Verso, 2014).

5 Comme l’a dit Edward Said, c’est le « sens du sionisme pour ‘le monde comme sympathisant et comme audience’ qui a rendu le combat sioniste pour la Palestine, un combat lancé, approvisionné, et alimenté dans les grandes capitales de l’Occident », si efficace – et qui a assuré l’acquiescement et la connivence de l’Occident. Edward Said, « Permission to Narrate », Journal of Palestine Studies 13, 3 (Spring 1984): 27-48.

6 Frank Luntz, The Israel Project’s Global Language Dictionary, 2009.

Dina Matar

Membre d’Al-Shabaka, Dina Matar est senior lecturer en communication politique au Centre d’études sur le film et les médias à l’École des études orientales et africaines (School of Oriental and African Studies). Elle travaille sur la relation entre la culture, la communication et la politique, avec une attention particulière aux cas de la Palestine, du Liban et de la Syrie. Elle est l’auteure de “What it Means to be Palestinian: Stories of Palestinian Peoplehood” (Tauris, 2010); co-éditrice de “Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communication Practices in Palestine and Lebanon” (Taruis, 2013) et co-auteure de “The Hizbullah Phenomenon: Politics and Communication” (Hurst, 2014). Matar est aussi co-éditrice fondatrice de “The Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication.”

Traduit par Catherine G. Pour l’Agence Media Palestine

Source : Al Shabaka

 

Lien pour accéder à l'article original : https://al-shabaka.org/commentaries/whose-ethnic-cleansing-israels-appropriation-palestinian-narrative/

 

http://www.agencemediapalestine.fr/blog/2017/04/07/le-nettoyage-ethnique-de-qui-lappropriation-israelienne-de-lhistoire-palestinienne/

 
Repost 0
Published by CJPP5Al Shabaka.org / Agence Media Palestine.fr - dans Regards Régional Revue de presse
commenter cet article
9 avril 2017 7 09 /04 /avril /2017 22:38

Israeli forces raid Arrub College in response to alleged rock throwing

April 9, 2017 1:04 P.M. (Updated: April 9, 2017 5:29 P.M.)
 
 
Israeli soldiers question Palestinians on Arrub College's campus
 
 
HEBRON (Ma’an) -- Israeli forces raided Arrub College adjacent to al-Arrub refugee camp in the southern occupied West Bank district of Hebron on Sunday morning, in response to alleged rock throwing by local Palestinians at passing Israeli cars, local sources said.

An Israeli army spokesperson, who said she was unfamiliar with the incident, told Ma'an she was looking into the case.

Israel detains hundreds of Palestinians for alleged stone throwing every year.

Palestinian stone throwers face harsh penalties by Israeli authorities, with Israel passing a laws in 2015 allowing for up to 20 years in prison if charged with throwing stones at vehicles and a minimum of three years for the act of throwing a stone at an Israeli -- legislation rights groups say was designed specifically to target Palestinians, as Israelis and settlers are rarely prosecuted under the same standards of the law.

 
 
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
9 avril 2017 7 09 /04 /avril /2017 22:31
Publish Date: 2017/04/09
Abbas condemns Coptic church bombings in Egypt
 
 
 

RAMALLAH, April 9, 2017 (WAFA) – President Mahmoud Abbas condemned on Sunday two church bombings in Egypt that killed at least 36 people and injured more than 100 on Sunday morning.

Abbas described the bombings as an act of “terror” and said he and the Palestinian people stand with the people and leadership of Egypt in their fight against “terrorism”.

Earlier this day, a bomb exploded in a Coptic church north of Cairo, killing at least 26 people and wounding more than 50 others, while a suicide bomber killed at least six people and injured 66 in front of a church in Alexandria.

M.N

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=22bVCCa73495318413a22bVCC

 

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
9 avril 2017 7 09 /04 /avril /2017 22:26
Publish Date: 2017/04/09
Israel detained 509 Palestinians in March, says report
 

A joint report by the Commission of Detainees and Ex-Detainees Affairs, Palestinian Prisoner’s Society (PPS), Al Mezan center for Human Rights and Prisoners Support and Human Rights Association, said that Israeli forces has arrested 509 Palestinians, including 75 minors, 13 females, five journalists and one Palestinian Legislative Council member, in the West Bank and Gaza Strip in March 2017.

The report said that Israeli authorities issued 111 administration detention orders against Palestinian prisoners, including a female and a Legislative Council member, in March.

According to the report, the total number of Palestinian political prisoners in Israeli prisons is 6,500, with 500 of them being administrative detainees, 300 minors and 62 females.

K.T

 

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=GMyuOLa73482945624aGMyuOL

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article