Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
7 avril 2017 5 07 /04 /avril /2017 07:46
Publish Date: 2017/04/06
Israeli forces detain 25 Palestinians in West Bank, Jerusalem
 
 
 

RAMALLAH, April 6, 2017 (WAFA) – Israeli forces last night detained at least 25 Palestinians during raids across the occupied West Bank and in East Jerusalem, according to the Palestinian Prisoner’s Society (PPS).

PPS said Israeli army detained six Palestinians from Tulkarm area, four others from Qalqilia, four from Ramallah, three from Bethlehem, three others from Hebron, and one each in Jenin and Nablus.

Meanwhile, Israeli police and forces detained at least four Palestinians from East Jerusalem area.

M.N

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=GcwUH0a72508350552aGcwUH0

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
7 avril 2017 5 07 /04 /avril /2017 07:41

Israeli settlers close Nablus-area road in protest of alleged attack, vow revenge

 
 
April 6, 2017 2:31 P.M. (Updated: April 6, 2017 5:20 P.M.)
 
 
A protest held by Israeli settlers on April 6, 2017, with a little girl displaying a sign reading "Revenge" in Hebrew, after an alleged car-ramming attack in Ramallah that killed an Israeli and moderately injured another
 
BETHLEHEM (Ma'an) -- Dozens of Israeli settlers blocked off a road near the illegal Yizhar settlement in the northern occupied West Bank district of Nablus on Thursday, holding signs that called for revenge on Palestinians after an alleged car-ramming attack was carried out earlier in the day near the illegal Israeli Ofra settlement in Ramallah, which killed an Israeli and wounded another moderately.

Hebrew-language media reported that some 30 Israeli settlers, residing in the occupied Palestinian territory in contravention of international law, protested at the road under protection of armed Israeli forces, blocking Palestinian cars from passing through.

The settlers held signs reading “revenge” in Hebrew.

An Israeli army spokesperson said she would look into reports. However, she said she was not sure if Israeli army forces were at the scene. Spokespersons for the Israeli police and border police were not immediately available to comment.

 

 

Earlier on Thursday, an Israeli was killed and another moderately injured, after a Palestinian car slammed into them at the Ofra junction near the illegal Israeli settlement by the same name.

Israeli forces detained the Palestinian driver at the scene, who was later identified as Malik Ahmad Moussa Hamed, 23, from Silwad in northeastern Ramallah.

Israeli authorities have cracked down on alleged “incitement” among Palestinians -- detaining scores for Facebook posts since unrest first broke out in the Palestinian territory and Israel in 2015 -- charging that Palestinian "incitement" has fueled attacks against Israelis. It was unclear whether Israeli authorities would also consider Israeli settlers' calls for revenge “incitement” against Palestinians.

On Saturday, Israeli forces shot and killed 17-year-old Palestinian Ahmad Zahir Fathi Ghazal in occupied East Jerusalem's Old City, after he carried out a stabbing attack that left three Israelis lightly injured.

Witnesses said at the time that more than 25 bullet holes were puncturing the walls of the apartment, while adding that Israeli forces could have easily detained the teenager, "but they executed him."

 

 

Israeli forces also shot and killed a Palestinian woman last week after she allegedly carried out a stabbing attack near Damascus Gate in the Old City, in which no Israelis were injured. The Palestinian Ministry of Health identified the slain Palestinian woman as 49-year-old Siham Ratib Nimr, from East Jerusalem.

Nimr was the mother of Mustafa Nimr, a 27-year-old Palestinian who was killed in September when Israeli border police showered his vehicle with live fire as he was driving near clashes outside of Shufat refugee camp, while he was bringing home food and baby clothes.

The number of Palestinians killed by Israelis has increased to 17 since the start of 2017, 16 of whom have been killed by Israeli armed forces, and another by an Israeli settler. Meanwhile, seven Israeli have been killed by Palestinians during the same time period.

Though Israeli forces have claimed that Palestinians were allegedly attempting to carry out attacks when they were killed in seven of these cases, Palestinians and rights groups have disputed Israel's version of events in a number of cases.

Meanwhile, Palestinians have often cited the daily frustrations, unfettered illegal Israeli settlement expansion in Palestinian territory, and routine Israeli military violence imposed by Israel's nearly half century occupation of the Palestinian territory as main drivers for such attacks.

 
 
 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
7 avril 2017 5 07 /04 /avril /2017 07:33
Publish Date: 2017/04/06
Foreign Ministry calls on international community to take action against "Judaization of Jerusalem"
 
 
 

RAMALLAH, April 6, 2017 (WAFA) – The Ministry of Foreign Affairs called on Thursday upon the international community to take immediate action against what it described as Israel’s ongoing Judaization of Jerusalem.

The ministry condemned a recent tender by the so-called Western Wall Heritage Fund for restoration of the infrastructure of the Beit Halifah building in Al-Buraq Wall Square in Jerusalem.

The ministry also condemned the plan of the Jerusalem Municipality and the Jerusalem Development Authority to build a pedestrian bridge south of the Al-Aqsa Mosque to connect Abu Thur neighborhood and Mount Zion.

“The Israeli government, headed by Benjamin Netanyahu, continues to escalate its Judaization of occupied East Jerusalem and separating it from its Palestinian surroundings by changing its geographical, cultural and historical features,” the ministry said in a statement. “This aims at obliterating and falsifying the Palestinian Arab identity [of Jerusalem] and enforcing various kinds of oppression and coercion against its indigenous inhabitants to force them to leave the city.”

The Ministry stressed that occupied East Jerusalem is an integral part of the Palestinian territory occupied in 1967 and that all settlement activities are illegal and contrary to international law.

The ministry called on the international community, particularly the UNESCO, to force Israel to stop its attempts to Judaize Jerusalem and to halt all other forms of settlement activities.

M.N

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=yu4sEWa72509302305ayu4sEW

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
6 avril 2017 4 06 /04 /avril /2017 09:20

Behind the battle of Raqqa

 

 

Moves on Raqqa by Kurdish forces supported by US air cover are likely designed to carve out a Kurdish enclave in northern Syria

A Syrian Democratic Forces female fighter rides on the back of a pick-up truck near an Islamic State  banner east of Raqqa city  (photo: Reuters)
 
A Syrian Democratic Forces female fighter rides on the back of a pick-up truck near an Islamic State banner east of Raqqa city (photo: Reuters)
 
 
 

Last week, a joint force of US marines and predominantly Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) staged airborne entries into villages in the environs of the city of Raqqa, claimed by the Islamic State (IS) group as its capital in Syria.

Simultaneously, another force seized control of Tabaqa, a city in the vicinity of Raqqa, and its military airport. In the course of the battle, US forces staged intensive aerial assaults that destroyed 70 per cent of the city, killed dozens of civilians and displaced the remaining inhabitants, thereby facilitating the entry of the Kurdish forces.

IS control quickly collapsed before the onslaught as most of the group’s fighters withdrew, and medical and other services ground to a halt. After seizing control of the Tabaqa airport, Kurdish ground forces backed by US air cover advanced towards Raqqa in accordance with plans that some believe reflect a US desire for the Kurds to take control of the city.

During the clashes, the Kurds killed Syrian Arabs and committed acts of vengeance. Syrian opposition forces have interpreted these actions as a way of spreading terror among local residents, causing them to flee their homes so that these can be taken over by Kurds as part of the demographic engineering of northern Syria.

In tandem with the advance of the US-led Coalition and its Kurdish partners on the outskirts of Raqqa, forces loyal to the regime led by Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad made significant advances towards the city. These were assisted by the Kurds, who no longer conceal their collaboration with the Syrian regime and have made it clear that they are prepared to go further than military cooperation.

The Kurdish advance could not have happened without US support, especially given that Turkey considers Kurdish advances towards areas near its borders as a red line and a threat to its national security. A segment of the (Arab) Syrian opposition has grown convinced that some Kurds want to secede from Syria and sever a chunk of the north of the country for the creation of a Kurdish state, while others are close to the Syrian regime.

Some weeks before the joint Kurdish-Coalition assault on Raqqa, IS foreign fighters fled the city into the desert stretching towards the Iraqi border. The local fighters that remain have sensed the flaws in the group’s structure and the approaching end of its presence in the city. Gangs of thieves have proliferated, breaking into stores and vacant houses as IS loosens its strict control over behaviour.

The “Hisba” or anti-vice cars that once patrolled the streets of Raqqa, intimidating people and women in particular, have now vanished. Surveillance of the remaining Internet cafes has also grown laxer.

However, while IS control is growing looser, Arab-Kurdish animosity and tribal feuds among urban or village dwellers are growing in importance. IS also began to prepare for the battle of Raqqa over a month ago, heaping up earth mounds in front of buildings, sandbag barricades at street entrances, and tunnels around the city in preparation for street warfare.

It forced all men to wear the Afghan-style clothing that the jihadists have adopted so that the invading forces would not be able to distinguish civilians from combatants.

The sudden withdrawal of IS fighters from Raqqa has aroused suspicions among the armed and political Syrian opposition. These withdrawals have occurred before, and they have seemed to be staged operations whether to hand over vacated town to regime forces, as occurred in Palmyra, or to Kurdish militias, as occurred in the area around Hasaka.

The opposition fears that a similar scenario is planned for Raqqa: A handover to US-supported Kurdish militias without a fight or without a battle of any magnitude.

Rumours of the near collapse of the nearby Hasaka Dam also triggered panic in Raqqa. As the evacuation of a large portion of Raqqa’s inhabitants will facilitate the task of the incoming forces, it has not been difficult to determine the source of the rumours.

Before their march on Raqqa to liberate it from IS, the Kurds formed municipal councils, saying that they would impose these when the city is under Kurdish administration and include it in a Kurdish federal entity in northern Syria. Less than three per cent of the inhabitants of Raqqa are Kurds and 97 per cent are Arabs.

The Americans have tried to argue that the Kurdish militias, referred to as the SDF, are 75 per cent Arab. However, Arab forces have been excluded from the battle of Raqqa and the SDF contains no more than five per cent Arabs, most of whom have been recruited through coercion.

Turkey also stands to lose if the US allows the Kurdish militias to take control of Raqqa, allowing them to gain control of the whole of northern Syria and enabling them to connect the regions they plan to include in an autonomous Kurdish administration preparatory to secession or to an imposed federal system.

The 10 km that now separate the Kurdish militias from Raqqa will shape the path of the future of northern Syria. They will also define the US role, which the White House has not explained in spite of US President Donald Trump now passing the 100-day mark in office.

Speaking to Al-Ahram Weekly from Raqqa, Syrian opposition member Salem Haj Khalil said that “after the Kurds took control of Tabaqa airport thanks to US air cover, the US asked for the area to be turned into a ‘friendly zone’. The location of the airport makes it an excellent place for a US military base between Iraq, Turkey and Iran, however.”

He added that in order to turn the area into a “friendly zone” for US military aircraft, the Kurds would need to “forge alliances, whether through inducements or intimidation, with local Arab clans from Raqqa.”

One thing is clear from the developments on the ground, and that is that Turkey is now officially out of the game. The US and Russia have prevented it from curtailing the role of the Kurds and have only allowed it to control a small part of northern Syria containing border crossings between Syria and Turkey.

As for the Kurds who are allied with the Syrian regime, they will play a larger role, but one that serves primarily to partition Syria into zones of influence. This role, supported by the US, will have major repercussions on the conflicts and will pave the way to social and perhaps geographical divisions between the Syrian people and perhaps long-term conflict between the Syrians and the Kurds.

Syrian opposition member Samer Saifan explained the situation from the perspective of Arab Syrians when he said that “the Kurdish militias are at the heart of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a misleading name and a disguise for the Turkish-based Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) forces. The Arabs in the SDF are there to fill out the ranks – a few hundred Arabs enlisted in order to provide cover for the Kurdish goals of the militias.”

“The militias want to gain control over areas of northern and eastern Syria, areas where there are currently no Kurds. The departure of IS without a fight from many towns and villages in favour of the militias is suspicious, especially when this group has put up fierce resistance to the armed opposition.”

“The [Kurdish] forces have begun the assault on Raqqa to take the place of IS, while other Kurdish fighters are being brought in from Turkey, Iraq and Iran. This project is supported by the Americans and the Russians through the provision of arms, funds, training and air cover. It is a project for a grueling Kurdish-Arab war in the offing,” Saifan said.

http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/20076.aspx

Repost 0
Published by Al Ahram Weekly.eg.org - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
6 avril 2017 4 06 /04 /avril /2017 09:13

In midnight raids, Israeli soldiers enter homes in Nablus District, wake families, and use young men as human shields

Published:
4 Apr 2017

On two separate occasions in January and February 2017, large numbers of troops entered the villages of Beit Furik and Burin in Nablus District late at night. The soldiers went into numerous homes and woke families, including young children. They were not carrying out arrest raids and, in what appeared to be an afterthought, only searched some of the homes. In Beit Furik, soldiers questioned residents about their participation in a celebration held for a village resident who had been released from prison, and used one family home as a makeshift interrogation facility. In Burin, soldiers questioned young men about throwing stones and ordered residents to lead them to the homes of other youths. In both villages, neither the questioned residents nor their families were accused of a thing, and the late-night raid appeared to be a show of force and for the purpose of gathering general information about the village.

Sundus ‘Eid with her baby girl in front of their home. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017

 

Sundus ‘Eid with her baby girl in front of their home. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017

 

These incidents demonstrate, yet again, how the military – by intimidating people who stand accused of any wrongdoing - abuses its authority and power to invade the privacy and disrupt the routine of entire families, including young children. In Burin, the soldiers even made residents “escort” them throughout the village, using them as human shields at risk to their lives. These actions are attended by an absurd expectation that residents will cooperate, providing information about neighbors and leading soldiers to other homes, so they can harass more families.

The military law that applies in the West Bank permits officers and soldiers to enter the homes of Palestinians at any time, without having to show a warrant or justify their action. Israel’s security forces broadly abuse this authority, citing flimsy security considerations to justify frequent, arbitrary raids on homes. This unacceptable conduct reflects the military’s deep disregard for Palestinians’ dignity and right to live free of harassment.

Raids on homes in the village of Beit Furik:

On Wednesday night, 1 February 2017, military forces entered the Palestinian village of Beit Furik in Nablus District. They went into the homes of at least 11 families, in some cases forcibly breaking down the door. The soldiers demanded to know who lives in each house. In some cases, they made do with questioning the parents and checking their identity cards; in others, they also demanded that the children be woken. The soldiers gathered ten men from the village for questioning in one of the homes. Testimonies given to Salma a-Deb’i the next day (2 February) indicate that the men were questioned by soldiers and by ISA (Israeli Security Agency) agents who were with them, regarding their participation in a local celebration held to mark the release of a village resident from prison.

Fares Rim Hanani, 26, who lives in the village with his family, related in his testimony how soldiers entered his home and turned it into a makeshift headquarters for interrogation:

I live with my 72-year-old grandmother on the first floor of my family’s building. Above us live my parents, my two 17-year-old sisters, and my brother, who is 11. In the middle of the night, at about 1:00 A.M., I was woken by loud pounding on the front door of the building. I saw my mother and father hurrying downstairs. My father opened the door and we saw soldiers standing there, pointing their rifles at us. Six soldiers walked in and one of them ordered us to assemble the whole family in my grandmother’s apartment. A soldier asked my father and me for our identity cards. He opened up a tablet computer and it looked like he was using it to check the ID cards. He handed my father’s card back to him and started to check mine. He told me to come over to him and ordered me to hand over my mobile phone. Then he took me into another room and searched me. Their commander asked where I sleep and I showed them my bedroom. The soldiers started searching the room and asking where I hide weapons.

Then they took me up to my parents’ apartment on the second floor. There were a lot of soldiers there and I was surprised to see someone else from the village sitting in the living room. He was blindfolded and handcuffed. It was the imam of our mosque. Everyone knows him in the village, and he attends a lot of celebrations and mourning rituals. They took me into my brother’s bedroom and I was kept there with a soldier for an hour. During that time, I heard them interrogating the imam in Arabic. Then another soldier came in, holding my ID card. He gave it back to me and took me into the living room. There were two other people that I know from the village sitting there. One was blindfolded and handcuffed. The soldiers handcuffed me too. They took me into the guest bedroom, where two men in military uniform were sitting. One of them ordered me to sit down next to him. I sat down. For a few minutes, he didn’t talk to me and was busy with his phone. Then he started talking to me in fluent Arabic. He introduced himself as Captain Na’im and said he was in charge of the whole area. He asked how Wisam’s party was. He was talking about Wisam Malitat, a guy from our village who had been released after 13.5 years in Israeli prison. A party was thrown in his honor a few days ago. The “captain” asked me about photographs we have in the house of individuals who were killed, and I explained that they were relatives of ours. He also asked me about my job and about my finances. I think he wanted to see if I could be pressured for financial reasons. Then I was taken back down to the first floor, where I saw four other young guys from the village who had been brought in for interrogation. They questioned each of them for about 20 minutes and let them go. Before the soldiers left, “Captain Na’im” apologized for the inconvenience they’d caused us. They left the house in a total mess, and the floor and carpets covered in mud.

Rawnad Hanani, 21, married and a mother of two, described the military raid on her house:

Rawnad Hanani and her children. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’TselemI live with my husband, Yasser, 27, and our two children: Tayem, who is a year and a half old, and Ritaj, who was born a month ago. On 1 February 2017, at around 1:30 at night, I was nursing the baby when I heard loud knocking on the front door. I woke my husband up and he ran over to open the door so they wouldn’t break it down. A lot of soldiers came into the living room and one of them ordered us to get the children. I told them they were asleep, but the soldiers insisted. My husband brought in Tayem who had woken up and started screaming and crying. The soldiers told Yasser to hand him to me and go get his identity card. The soldier checked the card and told me to go get Yasser some clothes from the bedroom. I could barely move, because I was holding both kids. Tayem wouldn’t let me put him down. I was trembling as I took the clothes out of the closet, because I was worried about my husband and upset that Tayem was crying hysterically. I handed Yasser the clothes. The soldiers wouldn’t let him go to another room and made him change in front of everyone. They took him outside. When they left, I tried to come after them to say goodbye to Yasser, but the soldiers blocked me and closed the door to the house. I started crying because I thought he’d been arrested. Meanwhile, his mother had come over - she lives nearby. She also started crying when she saw Yasser being led away.

To my surprise, about an hour later, he came home. He said that the soldiers had taken him to Rim Fares Hanani’s house and interrogated him there. They had blindfolded and handcuffed him. Most of the questions were about a party that had been held in the village to celebrate Wisam Malitat’s release from prison. Tayem was terrified by the soldiers, and has refused to sleep in his own bed ever since. He has trouble falling asleep and wakes up in a panic. He’s still too young to be able to talk and express his fear.

Raids on homes in the village of Burin:

On Wednesday night, 4 January 2017, soldiers came to the Palestinian village of Burin in Nablus District and entered the homes of at least five families. The soldiers questioned youths about stone-throwing in the village, and in some cases demanded to be taken to the homes of other youths. Testimonies given to Salma a-Deb’i on 11 January, along with her investigation of the incident, indicate that no one was arrested or taken in for investigation following the questioning.

Sundus ‘Eid, 43, who lives in the village with her husband and their seven children, related in her testimony how soldiers entered their house in the middle of the night and interrogated her son:

Sundus ‘Eid. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017

At about 12:30 at night, I was woken by loud pounding on the front door. I knew it was the military, because it’s not the first time they’ve come to our house. The military raids the houses in the eastern part of the village, perhaps because we’re closer to the settlement of Giv’at Brakha, which was built on land that belongs to our village. I picked up my one-year-old daughter, Nayruz, and woke my ten-year-old son, Muhammad. He’s terrified of soldiers and I didn’t want them to wake him. My husband opened the door and in walked seven or eight masked soldiers. They were pointing their weapons at us. They ordered us to sit down and then told us to go outside. I refused. I said we had small children and that it was cold outside. The soldiers ordered my son Walid, 22, to go out. Three soldiers stayed in the living room to watch over the rest of us.

We heard the soldiers shouting at Walid outside, and heard him tell them that he couldn’t understand what they were saying. They were speaking in broken Arabic. I managed to work out that they were asking him about stone-throwing. Afterwards he told us that they had beaten him and that one soldier also hit him with his helmet. They wanted him to show them where teenage boys live. At some point, I think it was after about 15 minutes, my husband insisted on going outside to join Walid. He asked the soldiers to explain to him what they needed and said that he would give the answers. The soldiers told him to show them were young men live in the neighborhood, and he said that we don’t have any living nearby. He pointed out a neighbor’s house and said that it’s the home of an elderly musician, another house of a family that has only small children, and another family that has a 15-year-old son. The soldiers took my husband to the house of one of our neighbors, Murad Najar, and went inside and searched it. Then they got into their jeep, threw a stun grenade that shook our whole house, and drove away.

The children are still frightened, but they’re not the only ones. We adults are scared, too. Every time I hear them knock on the door, my pulse quickens and I start trembling. Even after they leave, my stomach is twisted in a knot and I can’t eat or drink. I can’t do a thing for several days afterwards, just lie in bed. My son Muhammad refuses to sleep alone. Maysaa, who is twelve, doesn’t want to go to bed and tells me she has nightmares about soldiers. Having soldiers invade your home is a very rough experience.

The village of Burin. Photo courtesy of the village council.

 

The village of Burin. Photo courtesy of the village council.

 

Hassan Najar, 19, related how the soldiers came into his house and made him go with them to point out the homes of teenagers:

I live with my family and work as a taxi driver in the village. On Wednesday, 4 January 2017, I was awakened at about 12:30 at night by the sound of shouting and loud pounding on the front door. My father and sisters woke up, too. My father opened the door and five soldiers came into the living room, where I was with the rest of the family. One of the soldiers beckoned me over and I went over to him. The soldiers grabbed me by the shirt and dragged me into my father’s bedroom. A masked soldier asked me in Arabic whether I throw stones, and I said I don’t. He asked me again, several times. Then the soldiers told me to get dressed and go with them. I thought they were going to arrest me. I’ve never been arrested before. I went to my room and got dressed in front of the soldiers, because they wouldn’t let me stay alone. My father tried to talk to them to understand what was going on. They took me outside and their officer said to me, in Hebrew: “You tell me where your friends live”. They led me over to a neighboring house and asked me who lives there. I said that a mother and her ten-year-old boy live there, while the husband and younger children are in Germany. Then they led me over to another house and pointed to it. I told them that a woman lives there with her young sons, and that her husband is abroad. The officer got angry and grabbed me. He said I was lying and it couldn’t be that there aren’t any teenage boys in the neighborhood.

They made me go over and knock on the door of the house. The soldiers stood behind me. When the woman opened the door and saw the soldiers, she backed away in fear. They pushed me into the house and followed me in. Her children were home. They questioned her 17-year-old son Diaa outside while I stayed inside with the rest of the family and the soldiers. Then they led me to two other houses, where I also heard them question young guys about throwing stones.

 

http://www.btselem.org/harrasment/20170403_night_raids_in_nablus_area

 

Repost 0
Published by B'Tselem.org (Israel) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
6 avril 2017 4 06 /04 /avril /2017 09:09
Publish Date: 2017/04/04
Palestinian forced to demolish own home in Jerusalem
 
 
 

JERUSALEM, April 4, 2017 (WAFA) – A Palestinian Tuesday was forced to demolish his own home in Beit Hanina, a northern Jerusalem neighborhood, for lacking a building permit, local sources said.

They said Hafez Rajabi opted to demolish his home by himself after the Israeli West Jerusalem municipality informed him that he either tears down his home with his own hands or bear heavy costs if municipality crews demolish it.

Palestinians in the Israeli occupied parts of East Jerusalem are rarely granted construction permits, which force many to build without authorization.

Earlier Tuesday, Israeli bulldozers demolished 14 Palestinian apartments and razed lands and walls in an East Jerusalem neighborhood.

Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem, who number over 300,000, face serious shortage in housing because Israeli planning policies discriminate against them, “making it extremely difficult for them to obtain building permits,” as reported by the United Nations group, Office for the Coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in the occupied Palestinian territories.

In contrast, Israel has built dozens of settlements with thousands of housing unit for Jews on Palestinian land in East Jerusalem.

T.R./M.K.

http://english.wafa.ps/page.aspx?id=fMRurPa72487411986afMRurP

Repost 0
Published by WAFA Palestine News & Information agency - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
5 avril 2017 3 05 /04 /avril /2017 08:16

In midnight raids, Israeli soldiers enter homes in Nablus District, wake families, and use young men as human shields

Published:
4 Apr 2017

On two separate occasions in January and February 2017, large numbers of troops entered the villages of Beit Furik and Burin in Nablus District late at night. The soldiers went into numerous homes and woke families, including young children. They were not carrying out arrest raids and, in what appeared to be an afterthought, only searched some of the homes. In Beit Furik, soldiers questioned residents about their participation in a celebration held for a village resident who had been released from prison, and used one family home as a makeshift interrogation facility. In Burin, soldiers questioned young men about throwing stones and ordered residents to lead them to the homes of other youths. In both villages, neither the questioned residents nor their families were accused of a thing, and the late-night raid appeared to be a show of force and for the purpose of gathering general information about the village.

Sundus ‘Eid with her baby girl in front of their home. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017
Sundus ‘Eid with her baby girl in front of their home. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017

These incidents demonstrate, yet again, how the military – by intimidating people who stand accused of any wrongdoing - abuses its authority and power to invade the privacy and disrupt the routine of entire families, including young children. In Burin, the soldiers even made residents “escort” them throughout the village, using them as human shields at risk to their lives. These actions are attended by an absurd expectation that residents will cooperate, providing information about neighbors and leading soldiers to other homes, so they can harass more families.

The military law that applies in the West Bank permits officers and soldiers to enter the homes of Palestinians at any time, without having to show a warrant or justify their action. Israel’s security forces broadly abuse this authority, citing flimsy security considerations to justify frequent, arbitrary raids on homes. This unacceptable conduct reflects the military’s deep disregard for Palestinians’ dignity and right to live free of harassment.

Raids on homes in the village of Beit Furik:

On Wednesday night, 1 February 2017, military forces entered the Palestinian village of Beit Furik in Nablus District. They went into the homes of at least 11 families, in some cases forcibly breaking down the door. The soldiers demanded to know who lives in each house. In some cases, they made do with questioning the parents and checking their identity cards; in others, they also demanded that the children be woken. The soldiers gathered ten men from the village for questioning in one of the homes. Testimonies given to Salma a-Deb’i the next day (2 February) indicate that the men were questioned by soldiers and by ISA (Israeli Security Agency) agents who were with them, regarding their participation in a local celebration held to mark the release of a village resident from prison.

Fares Rim Hanani, 26, who lives in the village with his family, related in his testimony how soldiers entered his home and turned it into a makeshift headquarters for interrogation:

I live with my 72-year-old grandmother on the first floor of my family’s building. Above us live my parents, my two 17-year-old sisters, and my brother, who is 11. In the middle of the night, at about 1:00 A.M., I was woken by loud pounding on the front door of the building. I saw my mother and father hurrying downstairs. My father opened the door and we saw soldiers standing there, pointing their rifles at us. Six soldiers walked in and one of them ordered us to assemble the whole family in my grandmother’s apartment. A soldier asked my father and me for our identity cards. He opened up a tablet computer and it looked like he was using it to check the ID cards. He handed my father’s card back to him and started to check mine. He told me to come over to him and ordered me to hand over my mobile phone. Then he took me into another room and searched me. Their commander asked where I sleep and I showed them my bedroom. The soldiers started searching the room and asking where I hide weapons.

Then they took me up to my parents’ apartment on the second floor. There were a lot of soldiers there and I was surprised to see someone else from the village sitting in the living room. He was blindfolded and handcuffed. It was the imam of our mosque. Everyone knows him in the village, and he attends a lot of celebrations and mourning rituals. They took me into my brother’s bedroom and I was kept there with a soldier for an hour. During that time, I heard them interrogating the imam in Arabic. Then another soldier came in, holding my ID card. He gave it back to me and took me into the living room. There were two other people that I know from the village sitting there. One was blindfolded and handcuffed. The soldiers handcuffed me too. They took me into the guest bedroom, where two men in military uniform were sitting. One of them ordered me to sit down next to him. I sat down. For a few minutes, he didn’t talk to me and was busy with his phone. Then he started talking to me in fluent Arabic. He introduced himself as Captain Na’im and said he was in charge of the whole area. He asked how Wisam’s party was. He was talking about Wisam Malitat, a guy from our village who had been released after 13.5 years in Israeli prison. A party was thrown in his honor a few days ago. The “captain” asked me about photographs we have in the house of individuals who were killed, and I explained that they were relatives of ours. He also asked me about my job and about my finances. I think he wanted to see if I could be pressured for financial reasons. Then I was taken back down to the first floor, where I saw four other young guys from the village who had been brought in for interrogation. They questioned each of them for about 20 minutes and let them go. Before the soldiers left, “Captain Na’im” apologized for the inconvenience they’d caused us. They left the house in a total mess, and the floor and carpets covered in mud.

Rawnad Hanani, 21, married and a mother of two, described the military raid on her house:

Rawnad Hanani and her children. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’TselemI live with my husband, Yasser, 27, and our two children: Tayem, who is a year and a half old, and Ritaj, who was born a month ago. On 1 February 2017, at around 1:30 at night, I was nursing the baby when I heard loud knocking on the front door. I woke my husband up and he ran over to open the door so they wouldn’t break it down. A lot of soldiers came into the living room and one of them ordered us to get the children. I told them they were asleep, but the soldiers insisted. My husband brought in Tayem who had woken up and started screaming and crying. The soldiers told Yasser to hand him to me and go get his identity card. The soldier checked the card and told me to go get Yasser some clothes from the bedroom. I could barely move, because I was holding both kids. Tayem wouldn’t let me put him down. I was trembling as I took the clothes out of the closet, because I was worried about my husband and upset that Tayem was crying hysterically. I handed Yasser the clothes. The soldiers wouldn’t let him go to another room and made him change in front of everyone. They took him outside. When they left, I tried to come after them to say goodbye to Yasser, but the soldiers blocked me and closed the door to the house. I started crying because I thought he’d been arrested. Meanwhile, his mother had come over - she lives nearby. She also started crying when she saw Yasser being led away.

To my surprise, about an hour later, he came home. He said that the soldiers had taken him to Rim Fares Hanani’s house and interrogated him there. They had blindfolded and handcuffed him. Most of the questions were about a party that had been held in the village to celebrate Wisam Malitat’s release from prison. Tayem was terrified by the soldiers, and has refused to sleep in his own bed ever since. He has trouble falling asleep and wakes up in a panic. He’s still too young to be able to talk and express his fear.

Raids on homes in the village of Burin:

On Wednesday night, 4 January 2017, soldiers came to the Palestinian village of Burin in Nablus District and entered the homes of at least five families. The soldiers questioned youths about stone-throwing in the village, and in some cases demanded to be taken to the homes of other youths. Testimonies given to Salma a-Deb’i on 11 January, along with her investigation of the incident, indicate that no one was arrested or taken in for investigation following the questioning.

Sundus ‘Eid, 43, who lives in the village with her husband and their seven children, related in her testimony how soldiers entered their house in the middle of the night and interrogated her son:

Sundus ‘Eid. Photo by Salma a-Deb’i, B’Tselem, 11 Jan. 2017

At about 12:30 at night, I was woken by loud pounding on the front door. I knew it was the military, because it’s not the first time they’ve come to our house. The military raids the houses in the eastern part of the village, perhaps because we’re closer to the settlement of Giv’at Brakha, which was built on land that belongs to our village. I picked up my one-year-old daughter, Nayruz, and woke my ten-year-old son, Muhammad. He’s terrified of soldiers and I didn’t want them to wake him. My husband opened the door and in walked seven or eight masked soldiers. They were pointing their weapons at us. They ordered us to sit down and then told us to go outside. I refused. I said we had small children and that it was cold outside. The soldiers ordered my son Walid, 22, to go out. Three soldiers stayed in the living room to watch over the rest of us.

We heard the soldiers shouting at Walid outside, and heard him tell them that he couldn’t understand what they were saying. They were speaking in broken Arabic. I managed to work out that they were asking him about stone-throwing. Afterwards he told us that they had beaten him and that one soldier also hit him with his helmet. They wanted him to show them where teenage boys live. At some point, I think it was after about 15 minutes, my husband insisted on going outside to join Walid. He asked the soldiers to explain to him what they needed and said that he would give the answers. The soldiers told him to show them were young men live in the neighborhood, and he said that we don’t have any living nearby. He pointed out a neighbor’s house and said that it’s the home of an elderly musician, another house of a family that has only small children, and another family that has a 15-year-old son. The soldiers took my husband to the house of one of our neighbors, Murad Najar, and went inside and searched it. Then they got into their jeep, threw a stun grenade that shook our whole house, and drove away.

The children are still frightened, but they’re not the only ones. We adults are scared, too. Every time I hear them knock on the door, my pulse quickens and I start trembling. Even after they leave, my stomach is twisted in a knot and I can’t eat or drink. I can’t do a thing for several days afterwards, just lie in bed. My son Muhammad refuses to sleep alone. Maysaa, who is twelve, doesn’t want to go to bed and tells me she has nightmares about soldiers. Having soldiers invade your home is a very rough experience.

The village of Burin. Photo courtesy of the village council.
The village of Burin. Photo courtesy of the village council.

Hassan Najar, 19, related how the soldiers came into his house and made him go with them to point out the homes of teenagers:

I live with my family and work as a taxi driver in the village. On Wednesday, 4 January 2017, I was awakened at about 12:30 at night by the sound of shouting and loud pounding on the front door. My father and sisters woke up, too. My father opened the door and five soldiers came into the living room, where I was with the rest of the family. One of the soldiers beckoned me over and I went over to him. The soldiers grabbed me by the shirt and dragged me into my father’s bedroom. A masked soldier asked me in Arabic whether I throw stones, and I said I don’t. He asked me again, several times. Then the soldiers told me to get dressed and go with them. I thought they were going to arrest me. I’ve never been arrested before. I went to my room and got dressed in front of the soldiers, because they wouldn’t let me stay alone. My father tried to talk to them to understand what was going on. They took me outside and their officer said to me, in Hebrew: “You tell me where your friends live”. They led me over to a neighboring house and asked me who lives there. I said that a mother and her ten-year-old boy live there, while the husband and younger children are in Germany. Then they led me over to another house and pointed to it. I told them that a woman lives there with her young sons, and that her husband is abroad. The officer got angry and grabbed me. He said I was lying and it couldn’t be that there aren’t any teenage boys in the neighborhood.

They made me go over and knock on the door of the house. The soldiers stood behind me. When the woman opened the door and saw the soldiers, she backed away in fear. They pushed me into the house and followed me in. Her children were home. They questioned her 17-year-old son Diaa outside while I stayed inside with the rest of the family and the soldiers. Then they led me to two other houses, where I also heard them question young guys about throwing stones.

 

http://www.btselem.org/harrasment/20170403_night_raids_in_nablus_area

 

Repost 0
Published by B'Tselem.org (Israel) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
5 avril 2017 3 05 /04 /avril /2017 08:14

L’UE proteste vivement contre les démolitions de maisons palestiniennes en Zone C, et avertit que cela conduira à un « transfert forcé »

 

 

Une rencontre de routine entre le directeur du ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères et les envoyés de l’UE la semaine dernière a été transformée en protestation par les États européens contre le projet d’Israël de démolir un village bédouin.

 

L’Union européenne a exigé qu’Israël cesse de démolir les maisons des Palestiniens en Zone C en Cisjordanie, et particulièrement s’agissant du village bédouin de Khan al-Ahmar proche de la colonie Ma’aleh Adumim car cela entraînerait un transfert forcé de ses habitants et constituerait une violation de la Convention de Genève.

Selon les diplomates israéliens et européens, ce message sévère, au nom de tous les membres de l’UE, a été adressé la semaine dernière par l’ambassadeur de l’UE en Israël, Lars Faaborg-Andersen, au nouveau directeur-général du ministère des Affaires étrangères d’Israël, Yuval Rotem.

Les diplomates israéliens et européens ont déclaré que, la semaine dernière, Rotem avait tenu sa première réunion avec les ambassadeurs de tous les États membres de l’UE en Israël. La réunion, qui s’est tenue à l’Hôtel Dan à Tel Aviv, devait être une réunion d’informations de routine avec les envoyés de l’UE, mais qu’elle s’est transformée, au moins au départ, en une confrontation sur la politique du gouvernement en Zone C, où Israël exerce un contrôle civil et sécurité total.

Immédiatement après le début de la rencontre, Faaborg-Andersen a annoncé qu’il profitait de la réunion pour envoyer un message qui avait été approuvé par la commission Sécurité et Diplomatie de l’UE, dans laquelle tous les 28 États membres sont représentés. Le document, obtenu par Haaretz, est rédigé en termes vigoureux et qualifie Israël de « puissance occupante ».

« La mise en œuvre de mesures d’exécution telles que les transferts forcés, les expulsions, les démolitions et confiscations de maisons et de biens humanitaires (notamment financés par l’UE) et l’entrave à la fourniture de l’aide humanitaire, sont contraires aux obligations d’Israël en vertu du droit international, y compris et en particulier des dispositions spécifiques de la IVe Convention de Genève… et causent des souffrances aux Palestiniens ordinaires », affirme le document qui a été lu à voix haute par Faaborg-Andersen lors de la réunion.

« Nous demandons par conséquent à Israël, en tant que puissance occupante, de remplir ses obligations vis-à-vis de la population palestinienne en Zone C, de cesser totalement les démolitions et confiscations, et de laisser un plein accès à l’aide militaire. Nous demandons instamment à Israël d’accélérer les agréments aux plans directeurs palestiniens, de cesser les transferts forcés de la population et les démolitions des logements et infrastructures des Palestiniens ; de simplifier les procédures administratives pour l’obtention du permis de construire, d’assurer l’accès à l’eau, et de répondre aux besoins humanitaires ».

Selon les diplomates : une atmosphère très tendue

Selon les diplomates présents, Rotem a été déconcerté par le message. L’atmosphère était très tendue et Rotem a cyniquement remarqué, « Quelle merveilleuse façon de commencer une première rencontre avec le directeur-général du ministère des Affaires étrangères ». Le porte-parole du ministère, Emmanuel Nahshon, a confirmé la remise de la protestation et du document par les ambassadeurs européens, mais il a déclaré aussi que la rencontre elle-même avait été conduite de façon professionnelle.

L’UE et ses États membres ont exprimé leurs préoccupations concernant la politique israélienne en Zone C depuis quelques temps. Néanmoins, cette protestation avait lieu dans le contexte de la remise d’une notification pour la démolition de toutes les 42 maisons de Khan al-Ahmar, village situé dans la zone stratégique appelée E1 qui relie Ma’ale Adumin à Jérusalem. L’UE craint que la démolition de ce village n’augure la construction d’une nouvelle colonie de peuplement sur le site.

Les habitants de Khan al-Amar vivent dans des structures temporaires sans aucunes commodités. Les Bédouins ici et dans les régions environnantes sont parmi les groupes les plus pauvres de Cisjordanie. Bien que toutes les structures du village aient été montées illégalement, l’Administration civile fermait les yeux depuis des années. Le village est le site de « l’école de pneus », une structure faite de vieux pneus qui enseigne à des centaines d’élèves de plusieurs villages bédouins non reconnus de la région. L’école, construite avec un financement italien, est devenue un symbole de la lutte des Bédouins contre la démolition du village.

Alfano Angelino, ministre des Affaires étrangères d’Italie, venu en Israël il y a deux semaines, a soulevé la question de la démolition de ce village lors de sa rencontre avec le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu. Alfano a demandé au Premier ministre de réexaminer la démolition, mais sa requête a été catégoriquement rejetée. « Tout comme nous n’avons pas approuvé la construction illégale d’Amona par les Juifs, nous n’autoriserons pas davantage de constructions illégales par les Palestiniens » a dit Netanyhu.

La lettre lue par Faaborg-Andersen lors de la rencontre avec Rotem faisait mention spécifiquement de Khan al-Ahmar, ne serait-ce que parce que l’Italie et certains autres pays avaient contribué au financement des structures prévues pour la démolition.

« Environ 140 réfugiés palestiniens qui vivent dans la communauté depuis les années 1950 risqueraient un transfert forcé » a déclaré Faaborg-Andersen en lisant le texte. « En outre, 170 élèves de l’école de Khan al-Ahmar, qui dessert aussi les communautés environnantes, seraient laissés sans accès à l’enseignement. Nous demandons instamment à Israël de n’entreprendre aucune démolition dans la communauté. L’UE et les États membres de l’UE sont unis dans l’opinion que la Zone C est d’une importance cruciale pour la viabilité d’un futur État palestinien ».

Repost 0
Published by AURDIP.org / Haaretz.com (Israel) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
5 avril 2017 3 05 /04 /avril /2017 08:08

Israeli forces open fire at Palestinian homes, spray pesticides on crops in Gaza

April 4, 2017 2:17 P.M. (Updated: April 4, 2017 8:31 P.M.)
 
GAZA CITY
 
 
(Ma'an) -- Israeli forces opened fire on Tuesday morning at Palestinian houses and agricultural lands in eastern Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip.

Witnesses told Ma'an that gunshots were fired from Israeli military pillboxes across the border fence, causing material damage to a number of houses. No injuries were reported.

Separately, in the southeastern and central eastern parts of the Gaza Strip, Palestinian farmers reported that Israeli drones sprayed "poisonous pesticides” on crops near the borders with Israel.

They added that fields of melon, watermelon, okra, and wheat were sprayed with pesticides that may harm the crops.

An Israeli army spokesperson said they were looking into reports of both incidents.

Earlier this year, a similar incident took place in the Khan Yunis area when Israeli forces sprayed weedkillers on Gazan farmlands near the border, burning crops belonging to Palestinian farmers.

A Palestinian farmer called Abu Ahmad told Ma’an at the time that Israeli forces spray weed killers to dry wild plants on both sides of the border fence in order to “guarantee clear vision for the Israeli army to watch the area and prevent entry of Palestinians into Israel.”

He highlighted that the spray travels “dozens of meters” throughout the air away from the targeted area, causing serious damages to Palestinian crops far beyond the buffer zone.

Agronomist Wael Thabet of the Gaza Ministry of Agriculture told Ma’an that the ministry had asked several international human rights groups two years ago to intervene and ask Israel to stop spraying weed killers near the border area.

"[The Israeli] occupation didn't respond positively and claimed that the process is meant to get rid of wild plants and weeds."

Reiterating Abu Ahmad’s point, Thabet said that the excess spray can travel up to 1,200 meters through the air away from the buffer zone, burning crops and causing Palestinian farmers huge economic losses.

Thabet added that the farmlands near the border area constitute about one third of the agricultural space in the besieged coastal enclave.

Palestinians who live and work near the unilaterally declared “buffer zone” between the Palestinian enclave and Israel also often come under fire from military forces, as the Israeli military has not made clear the precise area of the designated zone.

The practice has in effect destroyed much of the agricultural sector of the blockaded coastal enclave.

 
 
http://www.maannews.com/Content.aspx?id=776259
Repost 0
Published by Ma'an News agency.com (Palestine) - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article
5 avril 2017 3 05 /04 /avril /2017 08:05

L’UE proteste vivement contre les démolitions de maisons palestiniennes en Zone C, et avertit que cela conduira à un « transfert forcé »

 

 

Une rencontre de routine entre le directeur du ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères et les envoyés de l’UE la semaine dernière a été transformée en protestation par les États européens contre le projet d’Israël de démolir un village bédouin.

 

L’Union européenne a exigé qu’Israël cesse de démolir les maisons des Palestiniens en Zone C en Cisjordanie, et particulièrement s’agissant du village bédouin de Khan al-Ahmar proche de la colonie Ma’aleh Adumim car cela entraînerait un transfert forcé de ses habitants et constituerait une violation de la Convention de Genève.

Selon les diplomates israéliens et européens, ce message sévère, au nom de tous les membres de l’UE, a été adressé la semaine dernière par l’ambassadeur de l’UE en Israël, Lars Faaborg-Andersen, au nouveau directeur-général du ministère des Affaires étrangères d’Israël, Yuval Rotem.

Les diplomates israéliens et européens ont déclaré que, la semaine dernière, Rotem avait tenu sa première réunion avec les ambassadeurs de tous les États membres de l’UE en Israël. La réunion, qui s’est tenue à l’Hôtel Dan à Tel Aviv, devait être une réunion d’informations de routine avec les envoyés de l’UE, mais qu’elle s’est transformée, au moins au départ, en une confrontation sur la politique du gouvernement en Zone C, où Israël exerce un contrôle civil et sécurité total.

Immédiatement après le début de la rencontre, Faaborg-Andersen a annoncé qu’il profitait de la réunion pour envoyer un message qui avait été approuvé par la commission Sécurité et Diplomatie de l’UE, dans laquelle tous les 28 États membres sont représentés. Le document, obtenu par Haaretz, est rédigé en termes vigoureux et qualifie Israël de « puissance occupante ».

« La mise en œuvre de mesures d’exécution telles que les transferts forcés, les expulsions, les démolitions et confiscations de maisons et de biens humanitaires (notamment financés par l’UE) et l’entrave à la fourniture de l’aide humanitaire, sont contraires aux obligations d’Israël en vertu du droit international, y compris et en particulier des dispositions spécifiques de la IVe Convention de Genève… et causent des souffrances aux Palestiniens ordinaires », affirme le document qui a été lu à voix haute par Faaborg-Andersen lors de la réunion.

« Nous demandons par conséquent à Israël, en tant que puissance occupante, de remplir ses obligations vis-à-vis de la population palestinienne en Zone C, de cesser totalement les démolitions et confiscations, et de laisser un plein accès à l’aide militaire. Nous demandons instamment à Israël d’accélérer les agréments aux plans directeurs palestiniens, de cesser les transferts forcés de la population et les démolitions des logements et infrastructures des Palestiniens ; de simplifier les procédures administratives pour l’obtention du permis de construire, d’assurer l’accès à l’eau, et de répondre aux besoins humanitaires ».

Selon les diplomates : une atmosphère très tendue

Selon les diplomates présents, Rotem a été déconcerté par le message. L’atmosphère était très tendue et Rotem a cyniquement remarqué, « Quelle merveilleuse façon de commencer une première rencontre avec le directeur-général du ministère des Affaires étrangères ». Le porte-parole du ministère, Emmanuel Nahshon, a confirmé la remise de la protestation et du document par les ambassadeurs européens, mais il a déclaré aussi que la rencontre elle-même avait été conduite de façon professionnelle.

L’UE et ses États membres ont exprimé leurs préoccupations concernant la politique israélienne en Zone C depuis quelques temps. Néanmoins, cette protestation avait lieu dans le contexte de la remise d’une notification pour la démolition de toutes les 42 maisons de Khan al-Ahmar, village situé dans la zone stratégique appelée E1 qui relie Ma’ale Adumin à Jérusalem. L’UE craint que la démolition de ce village n’augure la construction d’une nouvelle colonie de peuplement sur le site.

Les habitants de Khan al-Amar vivent dans des structures temporaires sans aucunes commodités. Les Bédouins ici et dans les régions environnantes sont parmi les groupes les plus pauvres de Cisjordanie. Bien que toutes les structures du village aient été montées illégalement, l’Administration civile fermait les yeux depuis des années. Le village est le site de « l’école de pneus », une structure faite de vieux pneus qui enseigne à des centaines d’élèves de plusieurs villages bédouins non reconnus de la région. L’école, construite avec un financement italien, est devenue un symbole de la lutte des Bédouins contre la démolition du village.

Alfano Angelino, ministre des Affaires étrangères d’Italie, venu en Israël il y a deux semaines, a soulevé la question de la démolition de ce village lors de sa rencontre avec le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu. Alfano a demandé au Premier ministre de réexaminer la démolition, mais sa requête a été catégoriquement rejetée. « Tout comme nous n’avons pas approuvé la construction illégale d’Amona par les Juifs, nous n’autoriserons pas davantage de constructions illégales par les Palestiniens » a dit Netanyhu.

La lettre lue par Faaborg-Andersen lors de la rencontre avec Rotem faisait mention spécifiquement de Khan al-Ahmar, ne serait-ce que parce que l’Italie et certains autres pays avaient contribué au financement des structures prévues pour la démolition.

« Environ 140 réfugiés palestiniens qui vivent dans la communauté depuis les années 1950 risqueraient un transfert forcé » a déclaré Faaborg-Andersen en lisant le texte. « En outre, 170 élèves de l’école de Khan al-Ahmar, qui dessert aussi les communautés environnantes, seraient laissés sans accès à l’enseignement. Nous demandons instamment à Israël de n’entreprendre aucune démolition dans la communauté. L’UE et les États membres de l’UE sont unis dans l’opinion que la Zone C est d’une importance cruciale pour la viabilité d’un futur État palestinien ».

Repost 0
Published by Haaretz.com (Israel) / AURDIP.org - dans Regards Régional
commenter cet article