Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
23 juin 2017 5 23 /06 /juin /2017 07:06
As Syria’s war enters its endgame, the risk of a US-Russia conflict escalâtes
 
 

Competition between Washington and Moscow for a say in any peace deal is increasing the danger of a wider war starting by accident
 
 
Wednesday 21 June 2017 16.53 BST
 
Not for the first time there are dire warnings of a direct US-Russia confrontation in Syria that could escalate, in the worst case, into a third world war. What is going on has echoes of the proxy conflicts fought by the superpowers during the latter stages of the cold war, but with added elements of risk because the accepted rules and formal channels of communication to a large extent no longer exist.

The latest alarm sounded after US forces shot down a Syrian government warplane and Russia said it would in future treat any US plane flying west of the Euphrates as a potential target. Russia also announced that it was cutting the Russia-US hotline designed to prevent accidental clashes in the Syrian airspace. The US said it had acted in defence of opposition forces fighting Islamic State. Russia asked on what authority it was striking against the government of a foreign state.

day later, the US blamed Russia for a near-miss between their warplanes over the Baltic, and disclosed that there had been dozens of such near-misses in the region. The impression was created of inexorably rising tension and growing risk-taking along the whole of the east-west borderlands, with a mistake precipitating a direct clash seemingly only a matter of time.

The most perilous theatre, though, remains Syria, in part because of its complexity. Though in part, too, because the war may be nearing its endgame. President Bashar al-Assad seems now to believe that, with the Russian and Iranian support he commands, he will be able to reassert his rule over the whole of Syria. Talk of partition, new borders, autonomous regions and the rest has largely been silenced. Aleppo is in government hands; the battle for Raqqa is in progress, and the territory controlled by Isis – both in Syria and

This may explain why it is now harder for the US and Russia to claim that their chief purpose in Syria is to combat Isis, still less that they might make common cause. It is clear that the conflict in Syria, as it now stands, is first of all about the future of the country and second about competition for regional ascendancy – a competition in which Turkey and Iran are both players. Could this be why the US seems to have become more assertive?

Russia’s objectives in Syria have been clear from the start of its overt military intervention in September 2015 (even if the US and some of its allies refused to see them). It is true that as a longtime ally of Syria since cold-war times, Russia feels a certain loyalty to Assad. It is true, too, that it sees Syria as a place where it can regain some of the influence the Soviet Union had in the Middle East. But these considerations have always been secondary to its determination to keep Iraq – has shrunk.

This may explain why it is now harder for the US and Russia to claim that their chief purpose in Syria is to combat Isis, still less that they might make common cause. It is clear that the conflict in Syria, as it now stands, is first of all about the future of the country and second about competition for regional ascendancy – a competition in which Turkey and Iran are both players. Could this be why the US seems to have become more assertive?

Russia’s objectives in Syria have been clear from the start of its overt military intervention in September 2015 (even if the US and some of its allies refused to see them). It is true that as a longtime ally of Syria since cold-war times, Russia feels a certain loyalty to Assad. It is true, too, that it sees Syria as a place where it can regain some of the influence the Soviet Union had in the Middle East. But these considerations have always been secondary to its determination to keep Syria together as a unified state. To Moscow, Iraq and Libya stand as models for what Syria must be helped to avoid. Russia’s loyalty was only extended to Assad as he was the one person able to keep Syria together. Had a single opposition force emerged, Russia might well have left him to swing in the wind. But the opposition has never been united enough to present a credible alternative – even with the help it received from the US and others. Moscow has put pressure on Assad to accept elections and some form of power-sharing, but the military conflict must be over first. Its priority remains the unity and governability of Syria.

The US position, in contrast, looks inconsistent, to put it politely. While Barack Obama was president, the US supported a variety of opposition groups, and insisted – though the then-secretary of state, John Kerry, showed some flexibility – that Assad’s departure was a precondition for any settlement. Combating Isis was both part of the same purpose and distinct. It was thought that the election of Donald Trump could presage a sharp change in Syria policy. On the one hand, his hope of improving relations with Russia suggested the possibility of a settlement jointly underwritten. On the other, Trump had pledged to keep the US out of foreign wars and seemed not to regard Syria as a vital US interest. It seemed possible that the US would stand by as Assad capitalised on his victory at Aleppo and hastened to reassert control over the rest of the country. The US policy change, though, never really happened. The rapprochement with Moscow never even began, because of the hue and cry against Russia in Washington. Trump decided – or was persuaded – to enforce a “red line” that had been Obama’s, not his, and launched an air strike on a Syrian government airfield in response to evidence of a chemical attack on civilians. US support for rebel groups continued, to the point where the Syrian warplane was shot down by US forces last weekend. At the very least there are mixed messages here.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/21/syria-war-endgame-us-russia-conflict-washington-moscow-accidental-war

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by The Guardian.com - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2017 5 23 /06 /juin /2017 07:04
Le fils du roi obtient tous les pouvoirs en Arabie saoudite
 
 
 
 
Par

Chamboulant l’ordre de succession, le roi a confié à son fils Mohammed ben Salman, 31 ans, la direction du pays. Artisan d'un programme de modernisation du royaume il y a un an, c’est lui qui, en tant que ministre de la défense, a engagé la guerre au Yémen. Chassé de ses fonctions, Mohammed ben Nayef, successeur en titre du roi Salman, subit une rare humiliation.

Plus qu’une révolution de palais, c’est un séisme que vient de connaître le régime saoudien puisqu’un clan vient de prendre quasiment tous les pouvoirs, éliminant en grande partie son dernier rival, le privant dès lors de l’accès à nombre des richesses du royaume. En nommant par décret son jeune fils prince-héritier, en évinçant Mohammed ben Nayef, le prince-héritier en titre, privé de toutes ses autres fonctions – il était aussi vice-premier ministre et ministre de l'intérieur –, le vieux roi Salman confie à Mohammed ben Salman, âgé de 31 ans, la direction totale du pays, lui-même n’étant guère en état de régner.

Jusqu’alors, Mohammed ben Salman, alias MbS, était déjà l’homme fort du royaume, son père étant âgé (81 ans), malade, et usé physiquement. Il était non seulement vice-prince héritier et ministre de la défense mais aussi conseiller spécial du roi et présidait le Conseil des affaires économiques et de développement, l’organe qui supervise la toute-puissante Saudi Aramco, la première compagnie productrice de pétrole au monde. Ayant pris le contrôle du secteur le plus stratégique du pays, il avait ouvert la voie à sa privatisation partielle. En avril 2016, il avait aussi dévoilé un ambitieux programme de modernisation du Royaume, baptisé « Vision 2030 », pour tenter de l’arracher à la rente pétrolière et de desserrer l’emprise des religieux sur la société.

De toutes ses fonctions, il n’en a abandonné aucune. Au contraire ! Il a aussi pris à son rival Mohammed ben Nayef le poste de vice-premier ministre. Aussi, Mohammed ben Salman accapare-t-il désormais tous les pouvoirs. Semble lui échapper le ministère de l’intérieur, un État dans l’État à l’heure où la lutte contre le terrorisme est devenue une priorité. Ce ministère revient au prince Abdel Aziz Ben Saoud ben Nayef, qui serait un neveu de Mohammed ben Nayef. Mais l’homme est peu connu et est loin d’avoir l’envergure de MbS. Sa nomination apparaît dès lors comme un gage donné au clan des Nayef. « Il y a désormais une concentration de quasiment tous les pouvoirs entre les mains d’un homme seul, que d'aucuns considèrent par surcroît relativement inexpérimenté. Ses détracteurs émettent délibérément des doutes sur sa capacité à pouvoir assumer toutes ses fonctions », résume David Rigoulet-Droze, enseignant et chercheur, directeur de la revue Orients stratégiques, qui souligne également que la montée en puissance de MbS doit beaucoup aux liens très étroits qui l’unissent à son père, le roi Salman.

La chute du clan An-Nayyef, c’est l’épilogue d’une lutte entre MbS, et Mohammed ben Nayef, alias MbN, âgé de 57 ans, qui prétendait lui aussi au trône et avait acquis une grande notoriété grâce à ses succès dans sa lutte contre Al-Qaïda. Formé aux États-Unis, ce « Monsieur sécurité » plaisait ainsi beaucoup à la CIA et au Pentagone. Dans le Royaume, on assurait aussi qu’il avait la baraka, cette chance que Dieu accorde à ses élus, depuis l’attentat manqué contre lui, en août 2009, ce qui le valorisait beaucoup aux yeux des religieux. Lors d’une séance de pardon aux terroristes repentis ou prétendument repentis, l’un d’eux, Abdullah Hassan al-Assiri, frère d’Ibrahim al-Assiri, l’artificier en chef d’Al-Qaïda dans la péninsule Arabique (AQPA), avait placé un explosif dans son rectum qui avait été actionné lors de la rencontre avec le prince Nayef. Un coup de téléphone opportun avait sauvé la vie à ce dernier et il n’avait été que blessé.

Cette baraka n’a pas empêché MbS de gagner par K.O. dans la course à la succession après avoir sans cesse marqué des points ces deux dernières années contre son rival. C’est même quasiment une humiliation pour l'ancien prince héritier qui a dû cautionner la nomination de son successeur. « Je vais me reposer. Que Dieu t’aide », lui a-t-il écrit. La télévision d'État a diffusé des images montrant les deux hommes s'embrasser à la suite de l'annonce, faite avant l'aube.

La nomination de MbS comme prince-héritier a été approuvée par 31 des 34 membres du Conseil d'allégeance, qui a pour rôle de désigner le prince héritier à la majorité. « On ne sait pas qui n'a pas approuvé cette nomination. Mais c’est déjà un événement sans précédent dans le Royaume que l’on sache la répartition des votes. Jusqu’à présent, cela se faisait dans le secret de la délibération », souligne David Rigoulet-Droze. Il n’empêche que la mainmise de MbS sur tous les pouvoirs risque de heurter et d’inquiéter nombre des quelque 200 « grands princes » qui entendent participer au pouvoir, parmi lesquels une vingtaine sont des poids lourds. Tous vont-ils faire leur bayat (serment d’allégeance) lors d’une cérémonie prévue mercredi soir dans le palais que le souverain possède à La Mecque où devrait venir tout ce que l'Arabie saoudite compte de dignitaires ? Ce sera l’occasion de compter les princes mécontents qui, en principe, ne se déplaceront pas.

Pour l’Arabie saoudite, la prise du pouvoir par MbS ressemble à une révolution. Elle n’est pas en tout cas dans la logique dynastique traditionnelle. Le décret royal ouvre en effet la voie à la deuxième génération des Al-Saoud pour accéder au trône. Elle met fin au mode de succession dit adelphique qui prévoyait que l’accès au trône se transmettait d’abord entre frères avant le passage à la génération suivante, d’où des rois le plus souvent septuagénaires quand ils accédaient au pouvoir. Salman est ainsi le vingt-cinquième fils du fondateur de l’Arabie saoudite, Abdelaziz ben Abderrahmane al Saoud et le sixième des sept frères Soudayris, les fils de Hussa bint Ahmed al-Soudayri, sa femme préférée, dont faisaient également partie le roi Fahd ainsi que les princes héritiers Sultan, longtemps l’inamovible ministre de la défense et Nayef, longtemps à l’Intérieur. Les Soudayris sont considérés comme l'aile la plus dominatrice et prédatrice de la famille royale, le clan du défunt roi Abdallah, leur demi-frère, et prédécesseur de l’actuel roi, étant jugé plus accommodant.

C’est à présent un vrai faucon, pas étranger à la crise avec le Qatar et l'Iran, qui préside à la destinée du royaume saoudien. C’est enfin lui qui, en tant que ministre de la défense, a engagé la guerre au Yémen, le prince Nayef, qui a aussi une certaine autorité sur ce dossier puisqu’il est chargé de la lutte contre AQPA (née de la fusion entre Al-Qaïda en Arabie saoudite et Al-Qaïda au Yémen) apparaissant beaucoup plus réservé sur la nécessité d’intervenir militairement. Aujourd’hui, c’est l’enlisement pour l’armée saoudienne et ses alliés, l’opération militaire ne devant durer que quelques semaines. Mais, à l’évidence, le roi Salman ne lui a pas tenu rigueur de ce revers. « Sans doute, MbS et lui doivent-ils penser qu’il n’y avait pas d’autre issue, que l’intervention était nécessaire, ne serait-ce que pour montrer à Téhéran qu’il n’avait pas les mains libres au Yémen », conclut David Rigoulet-Droze.

 

 

https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/210617/le-fils-du-roi-obtient-tous-les-pouvoirs-en-arabie-saoudite

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by Mediapart.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2017 5 23 /06 /juin /2017 07:02
Qatar blockade: UAE lists demands to end crisis
 
 
 
 
AP says it obtained document listing demands, including that Qatar shut Al Jazeera and close Turkish military base within 10 days
 
 
 
Last update:
Friday 23 June 2017 4:02 UTC
 

The United Arab Emirates released some details about the demands that Abu Dhabi and its allies are making of Qatar in order to end the Gulf crisis, including their concerns about Doha's ties to Hamas and “financing extremism". The Associated Press later said it had obtained a copy of the full list of 13 demands.

Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt imposed a blockade on Doha late last month, closing their airspace and territorial waters to Qatari planes and ships. They have also severed diplomatic ties with the small Gulf state.

But as the crisis enters its fifth week, the US State Department on Tuesday urged the states allied against Doha to make their demands public and detail their accusations against Qatar.

UAE Foreign Minister Anwar Gargash on Thursday listed a few of the Gulf allies’ grievances in an interview with Saudi-owned AlHayat newspaper. He said the US had erred when it asked Gulf nations to release the demands. He said the list had already been handed over to Washington, which he said had promised to correct Tuesday’s statement.

Israeli minister calls for full Saudi ties and official Riyadh visit

The countries boycotting Qatar handed a list of 13 demands to Doha via Kuwait on Friday morning, which included closing Al Jazeera and shutting Turkey's military base in the tiny Gulf nation, according to an Associated Press report.

The AP added that the list stipulates Qatar must sever diplomatic ties with Iran as well as repay an unspecified amount of money to the boycotting countries. The list also says that each demand must be complied with within 10 days.

The report said the list also calls for the expulsion and freezing of funds for people associated witht the Muslim Brotherhood, Hezbollah, Hamas, al-Qaeda and the Islamic State group.

According to AP, the list commands Qatar to halt funding to other news publications, including Middle East Eye.

While the list has not been officially confirmed, AP said it came from "one of the countries involved in the dispute".

Although in his interview, Gargash repeated ambiguous accusations about Doha supporting terrorism, he also mentioned specific groups in Libya, including Shura Benghazi - a coalition of Islamist militias that include factions blacklisted by the US. Doha denies supporting terrorist groups.

Gargash called on Qatar to stop harbouring individuals who are sanctioned regionally and internationally for terrorism, as he put it. He cited a list of 59 Qatar-linked individuals and groups that included Doha-based charities.

He described Doha as a “safe haven” for extremism.

Gargash also criticised Qatar’s support for the Palestinian Islamist movement Hamas. “The demands also relate to dragging the Gulf into radical policies with Hamas and supporting the Muslim Brotherhood,” he told AlHayat. “The main concern for these demands is to stop Qatar from supporting terrorism.”

The Emirati minister referenced a move towards firmness in the international approach to terrorism, saying that fighting extremism has become a priority for the United States.

Although the US State Department and Pentagon are calling for a swift end to the crisis, US President Donald Trump has voiced full support for the Saudi-led sanctions against Qatar, accusing Doha of historically funding terrorism "at a very high level".

Gulf officials have also accused Qatar-based media outlets, namely Al Jazeera, of promoting extremism and interfering in the internal affairs of Egypt and Bahrain, among other countries.

Gargash denounced Al Jazeera, but did not elaborate on whether closing the network is among the demands for ending the diplomatic impasse.

"It is a news broadcast for the Muslim Brotherhood. It’s not what it used to be 10 years ago," he said. "It is a mouthpiece for extremism. It has whitewashed personalities that have becomes symbols for terrorism."

The UAE foreign minister described the deployment of Turkish troops to Qatar after the blockade as a “dangerous development”, saying that Ankara is trying to take advantage of the crisis to expand its regional influence, but it also wants to maintain its relations with Saudi Arabia.

 

http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/qatar-blockade-uae-sets-demands-end-crisis-1190365222

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by The Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2017 5 23 /06 /juin /2017 06:53
Le gendre de Trump au Proche-Orient pour des entretiens
 
 
 
 
Par
 
 
Jared Kushner, gendre de Donald Trump et proche conseiller du président américain, est arrivé mercredi en Israël où il a rencontré le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu avant de se rendre dans la soirée en Cisjordanie pour s'entretenir avec le président de l'Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas.
 
 
JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Jared Kushner, gendre de Donald Trump et proche conseiller du président américain, est arrivé mercredi en Israël où il a rencontré le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu avant de se rendre dans la soirée en Cisjordanie pour s'entretenir avec le président de l'Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas.

Agé de 36 ans, dépourvu d'expérience sur la scène diplomatique, Jared Kushner est épaulé par Jason Greenblatt, représentant spécial de Donald Trump pour les négociations internationales, qui est arrivé dès lundi dans l'Etat hébreu.

"C'est une opportunité de poursuivre nos objectifs communs en matière de sécurité, de prospérité et de paix", a déclaré Benjamin Netanyahu, un ami du père de Jared Kushner.

"Jared, je t'accueille ici dans cet esprit. Je vois tes efforts, ceux du président, et j'ai hâte de travailler avec vous pour atteindre nos objectifs communs", a-t-il poursuivi.

"Le président vous transmet ses salutations et c'est un honneur d'être ici avec vous", lui a répondu Jared Kushner.

Cette visite d'une vingtaine d'heures - Kushner doit repartir vers minuit - a été présentée par l'administration américaine comme une façon de maintenir le dialogue dans la région plutôt que le lancement d'une nouvelle étape du processus de paix israélo-palestinien. Jason Greenblatt poursuivra les discussions après le départ de Kushner, précise-t-on.

Lors de sa première tournée à l'étranger le mois dernier, Donald Trump a réaffirmé sa détermination à tout faire pour parvenir à un accord de paix dans le conflit israélo-palestinien sans pour autant avancer de piste concrète.

 

https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/210617/le-gendre-de-trump-au-proche-orient-pour-des-entretiens

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by Mediapart.fr / Reuters - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2017 4 22 /06 /juin /2017 01:09

 

Crise de l'électricité à Gaza: 1ère livraison égyptienne de carburant
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rafah (Territoires palestiniens) (AFP) - L'Egypte a entamé mercredi matin la livraison d'un million de litres de carburant aux deux millions de Gazaouis, qui ne disposent plus que de deux heures de courant par jour, a indiqué un responsable palestinien.

Ce "million de litres de carburant égyptien va être transporté par 22 camions via le terminal de Rafah", la seule ouverture de Gaza sur le monde qui ne soit pas tenue par Israël, a indiqué à l'AFP Waël Abou Omar, responsable palestinien au point de passage de Rafah.

Il sera directement acheminé vers l'unique centrale électrique de l'enclave côtière, à l'arrêt faute de fuel depuis deux mois et "sous 24 heures, la centrale électrique recommencera à fonctionner", a indiqué l'Autorité de l'énergie à Gaza.

Depuis qu'Israël a réduit ses livraisons d'électricité à Gaza lundi, l'ONU et les humanitaires ne cessaient de mettre en garde contre un "effondrement total" de la petite enclave palestinienne soumise depuis dix ans à un sévère blocus.

A Gaza, ravagée par les guerres et la pauvreté, l'alimentation en électricité est une préoccupation primordiale dans l'enclave en bordure du désert, a fortiori en plein ramadan et durant l'été.

En trois jours, Israël a réduit d'une trentaine de mégawatts l'approvisionnement des lignes électriques alimentant la

L'Etat hébreu explique avoir pris cette décision parce que l'Autorité palestinienne du président Mahmoud Abbas refusait désormais de régler la facture d'électricité de la bande de Gaza gouvernée sans partage par le Hamas islamiste, son grand rival.

Ce montant s'élève chaque mois à 11,3 millions d'euros pour 120 MW, répartis sur dix lignes israéliennes, soit un quart des besoins de la bande de Gaza estimés entre 450 et 500 MW.

En temps normal, l'unique centrale électrique de l'enclave, soumise à un sévère blocus israélien doublé de la fermeture de la frontière égyptienne, fournit à plein régime 65 MW et les lignes égyptiennes 23 MW.

Plusieurs fois endommagée par les guerres, la centrale subit régulièrement des baisses de régime et les lignes égyptiennes, abimées ou détruites par les affrontements entre l'insurrection jihadiste et l'armée égyptienne dans le Sinaï, ne sont plus d'une grande aide.

 
 
Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by Le Nouvel Observateur.com - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2017 4 22 /06 /juin /2017 01:04

Risques d’escalade dans le Golfe

 
 
 

Orient XXI > Magazine > Vidéo > Alain Gresh > Philippe Henri Gunet > 19 juin 2017

Le 5 juin 2017, l’Arabie saoudite, les Émirats arabes unis, le Bahreïn et l’Égypte ont décidé de rompre leurs relations diplomatiques avec le Qatar et ont pris une série de mesures politiques et économiques contre ce pays. Cette escalade fait peser de nouvelles menaces sur une région déjà ébranlée par la guerre au Yémen et les crises au Proche-Orient.

 
Risques d’escalade dans le Golfe (Orient XXI) - YouTube

Philippe Gunet. — Depuis quinze jours une crise oppose l’Arabie saoudite au Qatar. Riyad a lancé une offensive politique importante contre son voisin. Quels sont les événements qui l’ont caractérisée et surtout, quelles en sont les causes ?

Alain Gresh. — Ce qui caractérise l’offensive lancée par l’Arabie saoudite et ses alliés contre le Qatar c’est la violence, et le fait qu’on est tout de suite monté aux extrêmes. Ces pays ont rompu leurs relations diplomatiques avec le Qatar. Ils ont instauré un embargo sur les aéroports, sur les lignes aériennes qui viennent du Qatar, un embargo terrestre. Le Qatar a une seule frontière avec l’Arabie saoudite, par laquelle transite une grande partie de son approvisionnement ; elle a été fermée. L’Arabie saoudite a exclu le Qatar des coalitions diverses et variées de lutte contre le terrorisme et a demandé à son contingent militaire basé en Arabie saoudite à la frontière avec le Yémen de se retirer. C’est donc extrêmement violent. Et ce qui est frappant, quinze jours après, c’est que malgré tout, il ne semble pas que cette offensive donne des résultats, ni que le Qatar soit prêt à plier, ni que l’Arabie saoudite et ses alliés arrivent à constituer un front assez large pour l’isoler totalement. On a donc l’impression qu’au départ l’Arabie saoudite et ses alliés pensaient obtenir des résultats rapides, mais pour l’instant, ce n’est pas le cas.

P. G. Y avait-il des prémices à cette crise ? Finalement, que reproche l’Arabie saoudite au Qatar ?

A. G. — Il y a des tensions entre le Qatar et ses voisins depuis très longtemps. C’est lié au fait que le Qatar a toujours eu une politique indépendante, n’a pas voulu être sous la tutelle saoudienne, a développé des moyens de communication — dont la fameuse chaîne Al-Jazira, qui était un vecteur de critique, y compris de la monarchie saoudienne. Sur différents dossiers, les Qataris ont une position parfois difficile à comprendre. Avant les printemps arabes, par exemple, c’était le pays qui hébergeait la plus grande base américaine dans la région, avait des relations avec Israël et la Syrie, soutenait le Hezbollah. La cohérence était dans l’indépendance politique de la décision qatarienne.

Déjà en 2014 une première crise avait amené l’Arabie saoudite à simplement retirer son ambassadeur. Une forme d’arrangement avait abouti à ce que, notamment, la chaîne Al-Jazira et la presse qatariote soient moins critiques à l’égard de l’Arabie saoudite. Rien ne laissait donc présager une nouvelle crise dans la mesure où en mai 2017, quelque temps avant son déclenchement, au cours d’une réunion à Doha des ministres des affaires étrangères du conseil de coopération du Golfe (CCG), personne n’avait rien dit. La veille, le ministre des affaires étrangères saoudien Adel Al-Joubeir avait été appelé à intervenir devant tous les ambassadeurs du Qatar dans le monde sans rien évoquer des divergences. On savait qu’il y avait des tensions, mais pourquoi maintenant ?

Officiellement, on peut dire qu’il y a trois types de critiques : d’abord les médias, non seulement la chaîne Al-Jazira, mais tous les médias plus ou moins financés par le Qatar. Aujourd’hui les médias panarabes sont financés pour l’essentiel par l’Arabie saoudite. La voix différente du Qatar déplaît à l’Arabie saoudite, comme à son allié les Émirats arabes unis. Ils demandent la fermeture ou la transformation d’Al-Jazira, d’Al-Araby al-Jadid — un journal et une télévision basés à Londres, fondés par Azmi Bishara, qui est un intellectuel palestinien laïc, plutôt de gauche. Il y a beaucoup de demandes de ce type.

Ensuite, le Qatar est accusé d’aider le terrorisme. Or, c’est très difficile de savoir qui soutient le terrorisme. À un certain moment, le Qatar a aidé en Syrie des groupes qui étaient liés à Al-Qaida parce que leur objectif était le renversement du régime de Bachar Al-Assad, mais c’est également la politique de l’Arabie saoudite.

P. G. L’Arabie saoudite a fait la même chose...

A. G. — Et la Turquie aussi. C’est donc un peu difficile de prendre au sérieux cette accusation. En réalité, derrière, il y a plutôt une critique contre les Frères musulmans. Ceux-ci ont été soutenus pendant les printemps arabes par le Qatar. Ils ont eu un moment une influence importante qui inquiétait les Saoudiens, notamment en Égypte et en Tunisie, mais aujourd’hui le mouvement est en recul. Le Qatar abrite des dirigeants des Frères musulmans, mais peu de gens, à part en Égypte et en Arabie saoudite, considèrent qu’ils sont une organisation terroriste. Il y a eu récemment une enquête du Parlement britannique, pourtant très critique à l’égard des Frères musulmans, mais dont la conclusion est que ce n’est pas une organisation terroriste. Le Hamas, l’organisation palestinienne qui contrôle Gaza, est tout de même particulièrement ciblée, mais là aussi c’est un peu étrange dans la mesure où tout le monde reconnaît que le Hamas est une partie de l’équation palestinienne et qu’on ne peut sûrement pas le réduire à une organisation terroriste.

La troisième critique faite au Qatar concerne sa proximité et ses relations économiques avec l’Iran. J’ai rencontré il y a un an et demi le ministre des affaires étrangères du Qatar, il était très clair. D’une certaine manière, il accusait l’Iran de vouloir faire un califat chiite comme Abou Bakr Al-Bagdadi veut faire un califat sunnite, mais en même temps il disait : c’est un fait, ils sont là, la géographie commande. Il y a le champ gazier partagé de Pars Sud, et il va falloir composer avec eux.

P. G.Les Émirats arabes unis, qui ont suivi l’Arabie saoudite dans cette offensive, ont-ils les mêmes objectifs que l’Arabie saoudite ?

A. G. — Pas tout à fait. Il y a trois pôles dans cette offensive : l’Arabie saoudite, l’Égypte et les Émirats arabes unis. Pour l’Égypte, il s’agit de la lutte contre les Frères musulmans. Les Émirats arabes unis ont aussi une politique très hostile aux Frères musulmans, beaucoup plus même que l’Arabie saoudite, et par exemple au Yémen, où ils sont coalisés avec l’Arabie saoudite, ils n’apprécient pas l’alliance de l’Arabie saoudite avec les Frères musulmans locaux dans des luttes internes difficiles à comprendre. Les Émirats arabes unis sont aussi très présents sur le terrain libyen, face à des gens accusés d’être financés par le Qatar.

P. G.Pourquoi cette crise intervient-elle maintenant ? Tous ces reproches qu’expriment l’Arabie saoudite et les Émirats arabes unis ne sont pas nouveaux...

A. G. — Non seulement ils ne sont pas nouveaux, mais ils sont en partie injustifiés. La presse Al-Jazira ne critique pas l’Arabie saoudite, n’a jamais critiqué l’intervention saoudienne au Yémen, et des amis journalistes qui travaillent à Al-Jazira m’ont dit : « On a même interdiction de montrer les victimes civiles des bombardements saoudiens. » Or, depuis trois jours Al-Jazira évoque les conséquences dramatiques de l’intervention saoudienne au Yémen. C’est donc contreproductif du point de vue de l’Arabie saoudite.

Il y a une lutte pour le pouvoir en Arabie saoudite entre le roi, le prince héritier et le fils du roi qui est le vice-prince héritier, et une alliance entre le roi et son fils pour tenter d’éliminer le prince héritier. C’est le fils du roi, Mohammed Ben Salman, qui a été à l’initiative de la guerre contre le Yémen. Il mène une politique agressive pour essayer de s’affirmer. C’est lui l’architecte de la guerre au Yémen, mais il a échoué, et là on a l’impression qu’il est à la manœuvre pour avoir un rôle plus important. Et il agit avec le prince héritier des Émirats arabes unis, Mohammed Ben Zayed, qui est aussi très anti-Frères musulmans. Les politiques traditionnelles de ces pays étaient jusqu’ici relativement prudentes, et même s’ils intervenaient, ils faisaient attention aux équilibres. Là on a l’impression qu’ils sont prêts à tout pour bouleverser le rapport de force.

Le deuxième événement est l’élection de Donald Trump aux États-Unis.

P. G. — Cette offensive a été lancée par les Saoudiens, même s’ils ont été suivis par les Émirats, les Égyptiens et d’autres. Elle intervient au moment où l’Arabie saoudite tente de construire une alliance, officiellement contre le terrorisme, mais on comprend bien qu’en réalité il s’agit de créer autour de l’Arabie saoudite un front de pays essentiellement sunnites face à l’Iran. Cette action presque intestine au sein du CCG le fragilise. La Turquie vient aider le Qatar ; le sultanat d’Oman traditionnellement ne prend pas parti ; le Koweït essaie de faire la médiation... Finalement, l’Arabie saoudite ne s’est-elle pas tiré une balle dans le pied ?

A. G. — L’Arabie saoudite a voulu obtenir un soutien en faisant pression sur plusieurs pays. D’abord financièrement, mais comme elle est aussi la gardienne des deux lieux saints de l’islam et qu’elle décide du nombre de pélerins admis par pays, elle dispose d’un moyen de pression assez fort sur ce terrain. Par conséquent, elle a obtenu quelques soutiens d’autres pays que les Émirats arabes unis et l’Égypte : le Sénégal, les îles Maldives etc. Cependant, les grands pays musulmans ne se sont pas ralliés : l’Indonésie, le pays musulman le plus peuplé, a pris une position de neutralité. Le Pakistan est très réticent. Le Maroc a envoyé des vivres au Qatar alors qu’il est réputé — à juste titre — très proche de l’Arabie saoudite. Alors oui, l’Arabie saoudite s’est tiré une balle dans le pied. La Turquie vole au secours du Qatar, et on peut imaginer un rapprochement Iran-Turquie-Qatar qui serait une catastrophe pour la politique saoudienne. Mais en politique, les calculs ne réussissent pas toujours. On peut avoir un plan extrêmement bien élaboré qui tourne en catastrophe. Dans le cas qui nous occupe, c’est un peu tôt pour le dire, mais un autre élément joue : la désagrégation de toute la région, qui s’ajoute à la guerre en Irak, en Syrie, au Yémen. Les pays du Golfe étaient à peu près stables, et là on sent des prémices d’affrontements. Le blocus imposé au Qatar est un acte de guerre. Si le Qatar ripostait — mais ils n’ont pas les moyens de riposter militairement —, ce serait de la légitime défense. La situation est donc très tendue, mais j’espère qu’on n’ira pas jusqu’à la guerre.

P. G.-- Pour compliquer davantage, le discours américain est illisible, avec un président Donald Trump qui apparemment soutient la démarche saoudienne. Il l’a peut-être même un peu encouragée. Il a requalifié le Qatar comme l’un des principaux « sponsors » du terrorisme. En même temps, les USA viennent de signer un contrat de 12 milliards de dollars pour vendre des F-15 au Qatar. Comment l’expliquez-vous ?

A. G. — Les Américains ont deux bases au Qatar : une base de matériel prépositionné, susceptible d’armer plusieurs dizaines de milliers de soldats américains en cas de crise, et la base aérienne d’Al-Oudeid du Central Command (Centcom) qui coordonne notamment toutes les activités contre le terrorisme en Afghanistan et en Irak. C’est donc curieux qu’ils disent que le Qatar est un sponsor du terrorisme. Ce n’est pas tant que Donald Trump lui-même apparaisse illisible, car aucune politique d’aucun pays n’est homogène et sans contradictions, mais normalement, au bout de six mois, on a une administration (Pentagone, CIA, département d’État, Maison Blanche) qui fonctionne, et avec des arbitrages. Là on a l’impression qu’il n’y en a pas. De temps en temps, le secrétaire d’État dit quelque chose, le Pentagone dit autre chose et Donald Trump twitte sans savoir…

Apparemment le vice-prince héritier de l’Arabie saoudite, Mohammed Ben Salman, content d’être débarrassé de Barack Obama, pense pouvoir traiter directement avec Donald Trump, et même le mettre devant le fait accompli. Il s’attendait peut-être à un soutien plus important, sans se rendre compte justement de ces contradictions dans l’administration américaine. Les Américains ne peuvent pas se passer aujourd’hui de la base d’Al-Oudeid, donc ils ne peuvent pas non plus engager une crise qui pourrait amener les Qataris à dire qu’ils ont besoin d’une aide iranienne ou turque pour se défendre.

En 2003, après l’invasion de l’Irak par les États-Unis, les Saoudiens ont demandé le retrait d’une des bases nord-américaines installée là depuis 1990 et les Qataris l’ont acceptée. Ils s’en servent à présent de manière assez intelligente. De même, en achetant des F-15 pour une somme de 12 milliards de dollars, ils renforcent leurs relations avec Washington. Enfin, ils ont loué les services d’un lobbyiste aux États-Unis, John Aschroft, ancien procureur général. Le Qatar veut faire contrepoids au très puissant lobby émirati, souvent en alliance avec Israël, notamment contre l’aide du Qatar au Hamas et au Hezbollah. En ce moment, des millions de dollars affluent dans les caisses de différents lobbyistes à Washington.

P. G.Une ligne de fracture se dessinerait-elle actuellement entre l’Arabie saoudite, les Émirats arabes unis, Israël d’un côté et la Turquie, le Qatar et une alliance presque avec l’Iran, et même avec l’islam politique de l’autre ?

A. G. — C’est tout à fait ça. Les Saoudiens se tirent une balle dans le pied et tirent une balle dans le pied de la stratégie des États-Unis. S’il y a une chose claire dans la stratégie de Trump et le résultat de sa visite dans la région, c’est de dire qu’il faut une alliance des pays arabes modérés avec Israël contre l’Iran. Or là, on contribue à casser le front des pays arabes, ce qui est négatif du point de vue nord-américain. Pour cette raison, je pense que Washington poussera quand même vers une solution, malgré les tweets de Trump, mais la tentative de solution est plus difficile qu’en 2014, parce qu’on est allé tout de suite aux extrêmes — un blocus, la rupture de relations diplomatiques. Et puis parce qu’en 2014, il y avait eu une sorte d’arrangement dans lequel personne n’avait perdu la face. Dans le cas présent, cela risque d’être plus compliqué.

La monarchie saoudienne se trouve dans une période de transition. Qui va succéder au roi ? C’est aussi un pays sans véritable administration, à la différence de l’Iran. On peut critiquer les Iraniens, mais ils ont une administration, un centre de pouvoir. En Arabie saoudite, cela se joue entre quelques personnes, et une nouvelle génération arrive aux affaires. Les « jeunes » sont peut-être plus ouverts et plus occidentalisés, mais ils ne connaissent pas vraiment la situation. Au Yémen, par exemple, l’ancienne génération saoudienne connaissait tout le monde ; ils savaient comment négocier. J’ai l’impression qu’aujourd’hui, cette compétence a disparu, ce qui rend les initiatives saoudiennes parfois totalement irréfléchies, avec des conséquences visibles au Yémen, où l’Arabie saoudite est en train de détruire le pays le plus pauvre de la planète, avec des conséquences humaines terribles. L’Arabie saoudite y est intervenue pour soi-disant rétablir un gouvernement légitime. Elle n’envoie pas de troupes au sol, mais les combats sont tellement durs, et les rebelles houthistes tellement efficaces — parce qu’ils se battent depuis des décennies alors que l’armée saoudienne ne sait pas se battre — que l’Arabie saoudite a été obligée d’évacuer toute la zone de la frontière sur 8 à 10 kilomètres. Tous ces conflits ne sont pas localisés parce que les gens sont liés. Une partie des Saoudiens est d’origine yéménite. Il y a des millions de Yéménites en Arabie saoudite, donc la guerre ajoute à la guerre.

 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by OrientXXI.info - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2017 4 22 /06 /juin /2017 00:50

Israel begins work on first settlement in 25 years as Jared Kushner flies in

 
 

Netanyahu announces ground-breaking at Amichai, which will house 300 hardline residents of illegal outpost of Amona

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by The Guardian.com (UK) - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2017 4 22 /06 /juin /2017 00:48

Qatar Ban : le pyromane Trump / le pompier Macron

#TensionsGolfe
 
17 juin 2017

 

Alors qu’une dégradation de la situation dans la région serait extrêmement négative, non seulement pour les pays concernés mais également pour le reste du monde, l'initiative du président français de servir d'intermédiaire paraît excellente

Mercredi 14 juin, au cours de sa visite au Maroc, l'Élysée a indiqué que le président Emmanuel Macron recevrait séparément l'émir du Qatar et le prince héritier d'Abou Dabi, en vue de faire baisser les tensions dans la région.

L’Arabie saoudite, les Émirats arabes unis et Bahreïn ont effectivement décrété un blocus à l'égard de l'émirat du Qatar, lui reprochant de soutenir le terrorisme. Les tensions sont très fortes et une dégradation de la situation dans la région serait extrêmement négative, non seulement pour les pays concernés mais également pour le reste du monde, du fait de l'importance des liens entretenus avec ces pays.

Le blocus est une décision très lourde, bien plus importante encore que la rupture des relations diplomatiques, et cela faisait très longtemps qu'une telle sentence n'avait pas été prononcée en relations internationales.

Ce que cachent les accusations de soutien au terrorisme

Quelle est l'origine du conflit entre l'Arabie saoudite et le Qatar ? Paradoxalement, ce qui les oppose est le fait qu’ils soient tous deux des pays sunnites et wahhabites. Le petit émirat a toujours voulu se distinguer de son voisin plus grand et plus puissant, il a donc cultivé une politique différente pour exister sur la scène internationale. Ainsi, depuis plus de vingt ans, l’émirat multiplie les initiatives pour exister face aux Saoudiens, qui le vivent comme un défi puisqu’ils considèrent parfois le Qatar comme une simple extension de leur royaume.

Depuis plus de vingt ans, l’émirat multiplie les initiatives pour exister face aux Saoudiens, qui le vivent comme un défi puisqu’ils considèrent parfois le Qatar comme une simple extension de leur royaume

Dans cet esprit, le Qatar a lancé la chaîne Al Jazeera, qui agace les monarchies du golfe. L’émirat a également soutenu les Printemps arabes, alors que les monarchies du Golfe y étaient opposées. Le Qatar soutient aussi les Frères musulmans, tandis qu’aux yeux du royaume saoudien, l'islam politique est une aberration, voire une menace à combattre. Enfin, les Saoudiens reprochent aux Qataris d'entretenir de bonnes relations avec l’Iran, alors qu’eux voient dans Téhéran une menace existentielle. Le Qatar a effectivement de bonnes relations de voisinage, entre autres raisons parce qu'il partage un gigantesque champ de gaz naturel avec l’Iran ; mais c'est également là aussi une façon de se distinguer de l’Arabie saoudite.

 

 


"Les accusations de soutien au terrorisme sont très graves et très largement exagérées. […] elles ont pour but de disqualifier les Qataris" - Pascal Boniface

 

Les accusations de soutien au terrorisme sont très graves et très largement exagérées. Les Frères musulmans sont un mouvement politique que l'on peut éventuellement combattre politiquement mais ce n'est en aucun cas un mouvement terroriste. Quant à l’Iran, bien que l’on puisse avoir des différends sur la nature du régime, il est faux de dire que Téhéran soutient le terrorisme. En réalité, ces accusations de terrorisme ont pour but de disqualifier les Qataris.

Donald Trump, l’incendiaire

Pour expliquer cette crise, l’élément le plus récent reste la visite de Donald Trump en Arabie saoudite. Les Saoudiens étaient très critiques à l'égard du président Barack Obama pour trois raisons majeures. Tout d’abord, ils reprochaient à Obama d'avoir lâché très rapidement Hosni Moubarak en Égypte, sapant de la sorte la confiance des Saoudiens dans la garantie de sécurité américaine. La monarchie estimait notamment que le pacte du Quincy de 1945 – selon lequel les Américains, en échange de l'accès au pétrole saoudien abondant et bon marché, garantissaient la sécurité du régime – était remis en cause par le fait qu'un allié aussi solide et docile que Moubarak ait été abandonné si rapidement par Washington.

À LIRE : Pourquoi la campagne contre le Qatar est vouée à l’échec

Deuxième point, la découverte importante de gisements de gaz de schiste et de pétrole aux États-Unis rendait ces derniers moins dépendants des matières premières énergétiques saoudiennes, remettant donc encore en question le pacte du Quincy.

Troisième raison, et non des moindres, l'accord sur le nucléaire iranien et la réconciliation qu'Obama a entamé avec l’Iran était insupportable pour les Saoudiens.

Les Saoudiens ont été suffisamment rassurés et confortés par Donald Trump pour se lancer dans cette politique relativement agressive à l'égard du Qatar

Dès lors, les Saoudiens s'étaient réjouis de l’arrivée de Donald Trump car ils connaissaient l'aversion du nouveau président à l'égard de l’Iran. Trump a effectué sa première visite bilatérale en Arabie saoudite, ce qui peut paraître curieux car ordinairement, la première visite bilatérale d'un président américain a lieu soit au Canada, soit au Mexique. À cette occasion, Trump a signé d'importants contrats, dont 110 milliards de contrats d'armements, relançant ainsi les tensions et la course aux armements dans la région. Les Saoudiens ont été suffisamment rassurés et confortés pour se lancer dans cette politique relativement agressive à l'égard du Qatar, ainsi que pour décider ce blocus.

Le rapprochement qatari-iranien : une prophétie auto-réalisatrice

Le problème est que cette politique ne peut produire que des perdants, pas de gagnants. Il est en effet peu probable que le Qatar change complètement de position et cède aux injonctions saoudiennes, car il perdrait alors son indépendance. Le risque serait plutôt de pousser davantage les Qataris dans les bras iraniens. En agissant de la sorte, les Saoudiens créent donc une prophétie auto-réalisatrice : craignant les liens entre le Qatar et l’Iran, ils poussent un peu plus l’émirat, s'il veut continuer à exister, à se rapprocher de Téhéran.

Entre parenthèses, ces événements montrent que la thèse souvent répandue selon laquelle le clivage majeur dans la région résiderait dans l’opposition sunnites versus chiites n'est pas aussi exacte. Le Qatar et l'Arabie saoudite sont en effet tous deux non seulement sunnites mais également wahhabites. L’émirat a de bonnes relations avec Téhéran et est soutenu non seulement par le Koweït et Oman, mais également par la Turquie. On voit donc deux blocs pouvant éventuellement se constituer, ce qui serait très dangereux. Une fois encore, ces profondes divisions montrent bien que l'unité arabe si souvent évoquée n’est qu’un mythe.

Une fois encore, ces profondes divisions montrent bien que l'unité arabe si souvent évoquée n’est qu’un mythe

Il est d'une importance capitale, non seulement pour les pays de la région mais pour l'ensemble du monde, que les tensions n’escaladent pas et, surtout, qu’elles diminuent. Pour cela, le blocus doit être suspendu et un accord doit voir le jour entre les Saoudiens, les Émiratis et les Qataris, afin que chacun puisse sortir la tête haute.

En ce sens, l'initiative du président Macron de servir d'intermédiaire est excellente – Oman pourrait également jouer ce rôle, de même que le secrétaire général de l'ONU – car au final, lorsqu’une telle opposition existe entre des pays, ils ne sont plus en mesure de se parler directement. Ce serait donc plus qu’honorable pour la France que de tenter de jouer les messieurs de bon office, certes sans avoir la certitude d'y parvenir, mais faisant au moins tous les efforts possibles. On voit là encore une différence dans cette affaire : Donald Trump a été l'incendiaire, tandis qu'Emmanuel Macron se propose à jouer le pompier.

 

- Pascal Boniface est directeur de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (IRIS) et enseignant à l’Institut d’études européennes de l’Université Paris 8, France. Il a écrit ou dirigé la publication d’une cinquantaine d’ouvrages ayant pour thème les relations internationales, les questions nucléaires et de désarmement, les rapports de force entre les puissances, la politique étrangère française, l’impact du sport dans les relations internationales, le conflit du Proche-Orient et ses répercussions en France.

Les opinions exprimées dans cet article n’engagent que leur auteur et ne reflètent pas nécessairement la politique éditoriale de Middle East Eye.

Photo : (de droite à gauche) le roi Abdallah II de Jordanie, le roi Salmane d’Arabie saoudite, le président américain Donald Trump, le prince héritier d'Abou Dabi Mohammed ben Zayed al-Nahyane et l’émir du Qatar Cheikh Tamim ben Hamad al-Thani posent pour une photo lors du Sommet arabo-islamo-américain à Riyad, Arabie saoudite, le 21 mai 2017 (Reuters).

 
 
 
 
Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0
Published by Le Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2017 4 22 /06 /juin /2017 00:44
La Suisse médiatrice dans l’affaire du Qatar?
 
 
 
L'invité Anouar Gharbi Directeur du Geneva Council for International Affairs and Development GCIAD
 
Une violente et grave crise diplomatique secoue actuellement la région du Golfe. En 1981, suite à la révolution iranienne, l’Arabie saoudite, les Emirats arabes unis, le Koweït, le Qatar, Bahreïn et Oman ont fondé le Conseil de coopération du Golfe (CCG) et un projet d’union entre les six Etats a été déposé par les Saoudiens ces dernières années.

Dans les années 90, le Qatar est devenu un acteur socio-économique très influent, notamment avec l’arrivée de la chaîne Al Jazeera. Cette dernière a séduit les peuples et agacé les dirigeants et les dictateurs. En 2011, le Printemps arabe et sa couverture par Al Jazeera ont accentué les clivages… Lors des élections qui ont suivi en Tunisie, au Maroc, en Libye et en Egypte, les électeurs ont été séduits par le discours des «islamistes». Les régimes saoudien, émirien et bahreïnien ont rapidement étouffé les manifestations et répondu à certaines revendications. Ces dernières années, les pays du CCG ont adopté des positions et des stratégies différentes et des fois conflictuelles. Il suffit de mentionner la vision par rapport au processus démocratique en Tunisie, l’agression israélienne contre Gaza en 2012 et en 2014, le coup d’Etat en Egypte en 2013, le conflit en Libye, la guerre en Syrie, le coup d’Etat militaire qui a échoué contre le président Erdogan l’année dernière, l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien ou même l’élection présidentielle aux Etats-Unis pour se rendre compte que les enjeux ne sont plus les mêmes. Certains discours de l’ancien président des Etats-Unis Barack Obama et de ses collaborateurs sur la démocratie et l’ouverture ont été perçus comme un soutien aux «islamistes».

Avec l’arrivée de l’homme d’affaires Donald Trump au pouvoir, certains ont considéré que le moment était venu de se débarrasser définitivement des maux du Printemps arabe, de la démocratie et des libertés. Ce que nous observons aujourd’hui est une vague de contre-révolution motivée par des désirs de haine et de vengeance. Ce courant a trouvé un soutien en la personne de Donald Trump ainsi qu’au sein des extrémistes de la droite conservatrice aux Etats-Unis. Trump a ainsi déclaré dans une vidéo diffusée sur les réseaux sociaux qu’il désirait obtenir 20 à 30% des richesses des pays du Golfe, et cela avant de devenir président des Etats-Unis. Avec sa politique dévastatrice dans une région complexe, M. Trump ne va pas «chasser» les extrémistes et les «terroristes» ni «isoler» l’Iran comme il le souhaite. Il va au contraire donner plus de temps et de moyens aux nids du terrorisme et renforcer la présence iranienne dans la région. Si le conflit n’est pas résolu rapidement, l’Iran, la Turquie et le Pakistan vont de ce fait avoir une présence beaucoup plus visible. Le Koweït et Oman seront ainsi obligés de choisir leur camp.

La Suisse est le pays le mieux placé pour comprendre les enjeux et ainsi jouer un rôle médiateur entre l’Arabie saoudite et le Qatar afin de résoudre ce conflit. Dans le cas contraire, ce dernier pourrait avoir un impact énorme sur l’économie, le sport ainsi que la stabilité et la sécurité dans le monde. (TDG)

Créé: 20.06.2017, 12h39

 

http://www.tdg.ch/reflexions/suisse-mediatrice-affaire-qatar/story/22175587

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.

 

 

Repost 0
Published by La Tribune de Genève.ch (Suisse) - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
21 juin 2017 3 21 /06 /juin /2017 05:56

Israël commence à réduire dangereusement les livraisons d'électricité à Gaza

 
 
 
Lundi, 19 Juin, 2017
Humanite.fr

 

 

Israël a commencé lundi à réduire les livraisons d'électricité aux deux millions de Gazaouis qui ne bénéficiaient déjà que de quelques heures d'électricité par jour. L’Onu évoque un risque d’effondrement total » des services vitaux pour la population.

Cette diminution, qui fait passer à deux heures par jour l'approvisionnement en électricité des Gazaouis, suscite des inquiétudes sur une montée des tensions et un possible effondrement des services vitaux dans un territoire qui a connu depuis 2007 trois guerres avec Israël et une quasi guerre civile entre mouvements palestiniens.

"L'approvisionnement sera réduit sur deux lignes sur dix chaque jour, jusqu'à ce que cette baisse s'applique à l'ensemble des dix lignes", a détaillé la compagnie d'électricité israélienne dans un communiqué.

Israël "a réduit lundi matin de huit mégawatts l'approvisionnement des lignes électriques" vers le territoire côtier surpeuplé et ravagé par les guerres et la pauvreté, a de son côté indiqué l'Autorité de l'énergie, tenue par le Hamas islamiste au pouvoir à Gaza, dans un communiqué.

En temps normal, Israël fournit 120 mégawatts à Gaza --soit un quart des besoins de l'enclave estimés entre 450 et 500 MW. La facture, payée par l'Autorité palestinienne pourtant chassée du pouvoir à Gaza par le Hamas, s'élève chaque mois à 11,3 millions d'euros.

Depuis que l'unique centrale électrique de la bande de Gaza est à l'arrêt faute de carburant, ces 120 MW représentent 80% de l'électricité disponible dans la bande de Gaza.

La réduction entamée lundi est "dangereuse" dans un territoire "en pénurie chronique d'énergie", a estimé l'Autorité de l'énergie. Elle en a fait porter la responsabilité à Israël et "aux parties impliquées dans la prise de cette décision".

Une histoire de facture à payer...

Mi-juin, le gouvernement israélien avait annoncé avoir décidé de réduire les livraisons, arguant que l'Autorité palestinienne du président Mahmoud Abbas refusait désormais de régler la facture d'électricité de la bande de Gaza. L'Autorité palestinienne, elle, accuse le Hamas de ne pas assumer l'approvisionnement en énergie du territoire qu'il contrôle sans partage.

L'ONU et de nombreuses organisations humanitaires ont mis en garde contre "un effondrement total" des services vitaux pour la population, notamment dans le secteur de la santé.

Dans un contexte de crise humanitaire et de marasme économique permanents, l'alimentation en électricité est une préoccupation primordiale dans l'enclave en bordure du désert, a fortiori en plein ramadan et durant l'été.

La question de l'électricité a déjà provoqué en janvier des manifestations de protestation, rares dans la bande de Gaza et aussitôt réprimées par les forces de sécurité du Hamas.

 

http://www.humanite.fr/israel-commence-reduire-dangereusement-les-livraisons-delectricite-gaza-637614

Les seules publications de notre blog qui engagent notre association sont notre charte et nos communiqués. Les autres articles publiés sur ce blog, sans nécessairement refléter exactement nos positions, nous ont paru intéressants à verser aux débats ou à porter à votre connaissance.
Repost 0