Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
28 novembre 2016 1 28 /11 /novembre /2016 09:52

Forests of hate: Fire imitates art in Israel

#InsideIsrael
 
 
 
 
 

The burning of forests in Israel - whoever is responsible - carries weighty symbolism in the context of its colonial history

In his well-known 1963 short story Facing the Forests, A.B. Yehoshua, one of Israel's most popular writers, tells of an encounter between a young Jewish forest ranger and an old Palestinian who lives in a man-made forest planted on the ruins of the village where he was born. Symbolically enough, the story ends with the Palestinian, whose tongue has been cut out for mysterious reasons, burns the forest to ash with the help of the young Jewish ranger.

As far as we know, Yehoshua's short story was not based on an actual event - but it certainly came back to life this week when Israel's top politicians and mass media blamed Palestinians for wildfires that ravaged the country, burning down large areas of forest and forcing tens of thousands of Israelis to evacuate their homes.

Listening to their prime minister, Benyamin Netanyahu, who described the fires as "arsonist terror," and to their mass media, which dubbed them the "Arson Intifada," most Israelis have been led to believe that the grandsons of Yehoshua's fictional arsonist are simply continuing the work he started.

Forests were an integral part of the Zionist project from the very start. The first Zionists conceived of Palestine as a "barren land," neglected by its inhabitants for centuries. From the beginnings of the Jewish colonisation in the early 20th century, a constant effort was made to "restore" Palestine to its original, biblical, grandeur by planting millions of trees, mostly pines.

The declared aim of this forestation effort was to change the shape of the land, make it "more adaptable" to Jewish settlement, and show "world nations how we revived the wilderness,” according to Yossef Weiz, senior manager of the Jewish National Fund (JNF), at a lecture in 1945. The Europe these Zionists had come from was heavily forested. They wanted to see the same landscape in Eretz Israel/Palestine.

After the 1948 war, forestation had another, more hidden, goal: to serve as a "cover" for the destroyed Palestinian villages on which many of them were planted, as an official from the JNF admitted frankly a few years ago.

Yet while Yehoshua's story represents a sense of guilt and an understanding of the suffering of Palestinians, today's Israel is far from any such feeling. Education minister Naftali Bennett, head of the Jewish Home party and a powerful member of the coalition government, led the chorus of blame, declaring early in the week that "only those to whom this land does not belong could burn it". The message was clear: the Palestinians are foreigners in this land, and therefore it is easy for them to burn it, along with the forests that we, the Jews, planted.

Questions do linger over the cause of the fires. There is no doubt that weather conditions played a major role in their swift spread, with blazes springing up in dozens or even hundreds of spots all around the country. Strong winds coming from the east, together with extremely high aridity and lack of rain for nearly ten months, created ripe conditions for fires.

The debate is as whether the original fires started as a result of negligence or of deliberate arson. This turned out to be a question of national importance when on Thursday the fires spread all over Haifa, Israel's third-largest city. Entire neighborhoods had to be evicted, and almost 1,000 apartments were badly damaged. For a while it seemed that the whole country was on fire.

The police’s early answer was that more than half of the 200 incidents of fire reported were a result of deliberate arson "on nationalistic grounds," a code for Palestinian attacks.

It is not clear where exactly did these figures come from, as it seems that only one case has been proved as deliberate arson, but suspicion had already been piled on the Palestinians, whether Israeli citizens or from the West Bank.

Netanyahu pointed directly towards "Palestinian terror," and Interior Security Minister Gilad Erdan warned that there may be "tens of thousands" of potential Palestinian arsonists waiting for their chance. Israel's largest website, Ynet, summed it up early on Thursday with a brighly-coloured graphic screaming: "Intifida of Fire".

Television studios, which broadcast live from Haifa and elsewhere, were packed with experts on “terror,” rather than experts on weather or climate changes. The general notion was that Israel was under a concerted and coordinated Palestinian fire attack.

During the huge fire that hit Mount Carmel six years ago, claiming the lives of 44 Israelis, similar allegations were directed towards a group of local Druze youngsters living in the area. They were arrested but were quickly released after their innocence was proved. This time a dozen Palestinians, most of them Israeli citizens - a small number compared to the scale of the fires - have been arrested, but even the allegations against most of them seem weak.

The fact that blazes also broke out near Palestinian villages and towns inside Israel as well as in the West Bank, in addition to similar fires in Lebanon and Syria, seems to suggest that premeditated arson would play but a small part in this wave of fires.

Yet the possibility that Palestinians were behind some of the fires cannot be ruled out. In some Arabic-language social media, the fires were described as "God's punishment" for Israeli plans to ban the use of the Islamic call to prayer inside Israel.

This move, perceived as an attempt to silence the Muslim presence in the country, has only added to the already tense atmosphere between Jews and Arabs. Some of the more violent blazes hit two West Bank settlements, Halamish and Maaleh Edomim; it is not impossible that some of these fires were indeed premeditated arsons.

But at the same time it looks improbable that arson has or will become a new Palestinian strategy of resistance. All the leaders of the Palestinian minority in Israel, led by Ayman Odeh, head of the Joint List and himself a resident of Haifa, condemned any presumed arson attempt and offered help to the victims.

A Fatah statement said that "what is being burnt now is our trees and our historic homeland". Almost a negative mirror image of Bennett's remarks, this is Palestinians claiming that Haifa belongs to them, no less than to the Jews, and that to burn it is to burn Palestinian heritage.

The wave of fires has certainly shown how ready the Israeli leadership is to use any opportunity to portray the Palestinian minority as the enemy within, without waiting for evidence or even trying to pretend that it seeks cooperation with its 1.5 million Arab citizens. It may also indicate that resentment within the Palestinian minority is now so high that at least some people may have gone and set light to the very nature they live in.

But there is also brighter side to these events. Haifa, with its mixed Arab and Jewish population and a tradition of relative tolerance, has showed resistance to this chauvinist wave of incitement. The day after the fires started to dwindle, in Jews and Arabs in downtown Haifa sat in the same coffee houses, speaking in Hebrew and Arabic. So far, the fires have not consumed the spirit of this city.  

 

 

- Meron Rapoport is an Israeli journalist and writer, winner of the Napoli International Prize for Journalism for an inquiry about the stealing of olive trees from their Palestinian owners. He is ex-head of the news department at Haaretz, and now an independent journalist.

The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.

Photo: A firefighter runs as fire consumes forests close to the mixed city of Haifa (AFP)

 

http://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/forests-hate-fire-imitates-art-israel-915620796

Repost 0
Published by The Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
27 novembre 2016 7 27 /11 /novembre /2016 10:04

Incendies en Israël : les Palestiniens aident à combattre les flammes

#Israël

Des avions étrangers ont commencé vendredi à aider Israël à combattre une série exceptionnelle d'incendies qui ont poussé à l'évacuation de dizaines de milliers de personnes

 
 
 
25 novembre 2016
Last update: 
Friday 25 November 2016

Israël, confronté depuis quatre jours sur tout son territoire à des dizaines de feux favorisés par une extrême sécheresse et des vents forts, a reçu des promesses de la part de la Russie, de la France, de la Turquie ou de plusieurs pays méditerranéens (Italie, Grèce, Croatie, Chypre) d'envoyer des appareils lui prêter main forte.

Les Palestiniens eux-mêmes sont venus dans la nuit à la rescousse, envoyant 41 pompiers et huit camions à Haïfa et à Beit Meir où, vision hors du commun, les hommes du feu israéliens et palestiniens ont combattu les flammes côte à côte.

Les incendies se sont poursuivis dans la nuit, forçant les secours à évacuer les centaines d'habitants de Beit Meir.

Les propos de plusieurs officiels israéliens sur les incendies ont été largement interprétés comme mettant en cause les Arabes israéliens ou les Palestiniens.

Le nationaliste religieux Naftali Bennett, a assuré que les feux ne pouvaient avoir été allumés par des juifs.

Le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu a prévenu que tout incendie volontaire serait traité comme un « acte de terrorisme », sans dire explicitement si c'était le cas de certains feux récents.

 

http://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/reportages/vid-o-isra-l-confront-des-incendies-exceptionnels-1541210283

Repost 0
Published by The Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
27 novembre 2016 7 27 /11 /novembre /2016 09:58
Conflit israélo-palestinien : la paix impossible
 
 
                  
Les gouvernements israéliens prétendent, depuis vingt ans, vouloir des négociations directes avec les Palestiniens. Une attitude qui masque en réalité le refus de tout dialogue et la volonté de voir l’occupation perdurer éternellement          
Une fois de plus, le gouvernement israélien a fait savoir, le 7 novembre dernier, son refus de participer à la conférence internationale pour la paix au Proche-Orient que la France souhaite organiser à Paris en décembre prochain. Pour les dirigeants de l’Etat hébreu,  des  « négociations directes » avec l’Autorité palestinienne demeurent la seule voie possible qui permettrait d’aboutir un jour à une « paix juste ». [1] 

Cette position n’est pas qu’une simple divergence sur la meilleure procédure à suivre pour parvenir un jour à la fin de l’occupation et à la création d’un Etat palestinien. En réalité,  elle ne fait que refléter d’une manière à la fois biaisée et brutale le refus constant qu’Israël oppose depuis près de vingt ans à la conclusion d’un véritable accord de paix. Une attitude qui trouve d’ailleurs ses racines dans les origines du sionisme, qui ont structuré, depuis plus d’un siècle, le noyau dur de l’identité israélienne.

Deux mots hébreux la résument : la houtspa  et la hasbara. Le premier peut être traduit par le « culot », une sorte de culte du fait accompli, l’équivalent de notre « impossible n’est pas français » : un volontarisme exacerbé qui à défaut de susciter le respect provoque au moins une certaine admiration, sans lequel l’Etat d’Israël – un projet conçu et nourri au départ par une poignée de militants nationalistes visionnaires et exaltés - n’aurait probablement jamais vu le jour. Et qui fonde notamment la règle selon laquelle tout arpent de la terre biblique gagné par les hasards des victoires militaires doit demeurer à jamais sous la souveraineté exclusive du peuple juif. Un credo difficilement justifiable au regard du droit international. Et qui donne tout son sens au second mot, la hasbara, que l’on peut traduire par l’« explication » : un discours (ce qu'on appelle aujourd'hui les « éléments de langage ») destiné en premier lieu à la société israélienne, qui peut y trouver de quoi se rassurer sur son innocence et renforcer sa cohésion ; en second lieu au reste du monde, pour tenter de le convaincre du bien-fondé de la position israélienne. En d’autres termes, un discours qui tente de justifier… l’injustifiable.  

C'est dans ce sens qu’il faut comprendre la déclaration officielle du 7 novembre, qui affirme privilégier la voie des « négociations directes » avec les Palestiniens : des négociations virtuelles et surréalistes qui n’ont pas la moindre chance de parvenir dans un avenir proche ou lointain à un quelconque accord de paix. Car la position israélienne s’inscrit en réalité dans toute une série de glissements sémantiques qui n’ont pour but  – en inversant les rôles – que de vider de sa substance l’idée même de négociation.  Le premier de ces glissements consiste à refuser l’arrêt de la colonisation de la Cisjordanie par laquelle Israël  grignote chaque jour un peu plus les territoires palestiniens, au motif qu’il ne serait pas raisonnable d’imposer un « préalable » à la négociation avant même qu'elle n’ait commencé. Un postulat qui, sur le mode « ne pas mettre la charrue avant les bœufs », se pare de l’apparence de la bonne foi mais qui consiste en réalité à vouloir continuer de manger le gâteau avant même d’avoir pu déterminer la part qui revient à chacun…

Le deuxième glissement est apparu il y a quelques années. Dans les décennies qui ont suivi la Guerre des Six jours, « les territoires occupés » constituait l’expression la plus communément admise par la société israélienne pour désigner la Cisjordanie. Façon d’admettre que ces territoires avaient vocation à être restitués un jour aux Palestiniens. Au début des années 2000, sous la pression de la droite religieuse, ces territoires furent désignés sous leur appellation biblique de Judée et Samarie. On les appelle à présent les « territoires disputés ». Une manière de considérer que si des négociations doivent un jour s’engager, leur hypothétique résultat demeure « ouvert » : ce territoire m’appartient autant qu’à toi. Peut-être, en définitive, partagerons-nous moitié-moitié ; à moins que 90% te revienne, et que je doive me contenter des 10% restant ; ou à moins que ça ne soit l’inverse…  La revendication de territoires « disputés » et le refus de poser tout « préalable » à la négociation revient ainsi à priver celle-ci de tout cadre défini et de tout objectif précis qui, rappelons-le tout de même, devrait viser à mettre fin à une occupation jugée illégitime par l’ensemble de la communauté internationale et à permettre la création d’un Etat palestinien souverain et indépendant.  Notons, à ce sujet, que depuis les débuts du sionisme, Israël s’est soigneusement abstenu de revendiquer le moindre tracé de frontière. Ainsi plus de cadre, ni d’objectif à des négociations directes qui perdent tout leur sens. Des rectifications de frontières par rapport à celles de 1967  sont certes envisageables, mais dès lors que c'est l’ensemble des territoires qui sont « disputés » sur quelle base va-t-on négocier ? Va-t-on interroger les astres ou lire dans les entrailles des animaux pour savoir à qui ils appartiennent ? Toute négociation suppose des compromis, mais imagine-t-on un débiteur discutant avec son créancier non seulement des délais de paiement ou de la remise de certaines majorations, mais mettant en doute jusqu'au principe même de la négociation et son objectif final, le remboursement de la dette ? La paix n’est pas pour demain.

     

 

 


 

[1] http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/2016/11/07/97001-20161107FILWWW00224-israel-refuse-de-participer-a-l-initiative-de-paix-francaise.php

 

 

https://blogs.mediapart.fr/guillaume-weill-raynal/blog/221116/conflit-israelo-palestinien-la-paix-impossible

Repost 0
Published by Mediapart.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
26 novembre 2016 6 26 /11 /novembre /2016 10:05

Actualité International

Israël dénonce la France après une décision sur les produits des colonies

Le ministère français est l'un des tout premiers à mettre en oeuvre les consignes passées en novembre 2015 par l'Union européenne.

Publié le | Le Point.fr
 
"En vertu du droit international, le plateau du Golan et la Cisjordanie, y compris Jérusalem-Est, ne font pas partie d'Israël", se justifie le ministère français. © AFP/ THOMAS COEX
Envoyer l'article à un ami
 
Israël dénonce la France après une décision sur les produits des colonies

Merci d'avoir partagé cet article avec vos amis

Merci de compléter ce formulaire

Message en cas d'erreur au focus sur le champ
 
Ajouter aux favoris
 

Cet article a été ajouté dans vos favoris.

 
 
 
 
Repost 0
Published by Le Point.fr / AFP - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
26 novembre 2016 6 26 /11 /novembre /2016 10:03

Fatah conference: The beginning of a change or a deepening of the crisis?

#PalestineState
 
 
 

The conference is being called without discussion or debate about the future leadership or a plan to unite the Palestinian factions

The Palestinian question is passing through a dangerous phase as a result of the continuing and deepening divisions among the political factions.

These divisions are deepening horizontally as well as vertically, with the continuing loss of direction that emanates from the dead-end strategies and the lack of content and courage that are necessary for the adoption of a new strategy.

What is the value of the conferences if their main theme is not about discussing the condition of the national cause, how it can be salvaged, where do we want to get to and how can we accomplish what we want?

What has added to the sharpness of the turning point is that fact that the two big factions in the Palestinian arena, Fatah and Hamas, are in a transitional period. Fatah is convening its seventh conference on the 29th of this month.

The most likely outcome of this gathering is that President Mahmoud Abbas will remain in office and his mandate as president will be extended, which will of course mean that his approach will continue and that the return of his leading rival, Mohammad Dahlan, to Fatah and the territories will be blocked in spite of the pressure exercised by the Arab Quartet (the UN, US, European Union and Russia).

The other less likely outcome is that the president will decide to hand over the leadership and give a new Fatah president a chance. This would in turn open the road before a brief transition period during which there will be elections for president of the Palestinian Authority and chairman of the PLO. It might be the case that powers will be distributed so as to allow one leader for Fatah, another for the PA, and a third for the PLO.

Hamas’s choice

On the other side, Hamas will conduct an election at the beginning of next year in order to choose a successor to Khaled Meshaal. The identity and the programme of the successor will determine which direction Hamas will head: to giving more priority to acting as an integral part of the Palestinian national movement over considering itself to be an extension of the Muslim Brotherhood movement, or toward extremism and excommunication of its enemies (takfir).

The election of Trump to the leadership of the world's biggest superpower will give a green light to the extreme Israeli government to do what it wants

What augments the difficulty of the situation is that the Arab conditions are in their worst ever state. In the meantime, the region and the world are preoccupied with other issues and priorities than the Palestinian question.

The election of Donald Trump as president of the United States has added salt to the wound. In his message to Israel after his election victory, Trump called it the only beacon of hope and democracy in the Middle East. During his election campaign he called for moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. He believes that the solution lies in bilateral negotiations without intervention from anyone. He also said that settlements were legitimate and that they did not constitute an obstacle in the face of peace. But he does not support the establishment of a “terrorist” Palestinian state.

Such a change in the leadership of the biggest superpower in the world will, at the least, give a green light to the extreme Israeli government to do what it wants. This is happening as Israel is entering what has been termed “the third republic”, which started in 2009 after the right and the religious far right took power and (re)adopted the plan to establish “greater Israel” by means of the ongoing, yet officially unannounced, annexation of Palestinian territories. This has become evident from the fact that the number of settlers in the West Bank has reached nearly 800,000, more than 350,000 of them are in East Jerusalem, amid publicly announced plans to raise the number to one million settlers in a few years.

Abbas’s choice

A great deal depends on what goes on inside the Fatah conference. Will the president endeavour to turn the conference into a tent that provides room for all the leaders and camps within Fatah, or will he proceed with the policy of settling scores, which he started with Dahlan and may very well continue so as to target others? Should the latter be the case, Fatah may witness an unprecedented vertical division. Or will the president be content with excommunicating Dahlan and his group but appease the other leaders by means of reserving them seats on the central committee and the Revolutionary Council?

Will the president endeavour to turn the conference into a tent that provides room for all the leaders and camps within Fatah, or will he proceed with the policy of settling scores

Will the Fatah conference elect a vice president or not? This is an important question. And who will it be? This is the more important question. Should the president choose a person who is not up to the job and who is not capable of replacing him once he is absent, it would be as if he did nothing. Rather, it would seem as if he exacerbated the situation and made it much worse.

Danger of fragmentation

Will the conference discuss distributing the responsibilities held by the president after he is gone, so that there would be a president for Fatah, another for the authority and a third for the PLO? If such a measure is taken without being part of a renaissance of the PLO as an institution, and if it happens without a new vision and new strategy, it would amount to a jump into the unknown and could lead to fragmenting of the centres of power and concentrating them in the hands of several individuals. This could result in pulverising of the PA.

The worst development at the moment is the decision to leave the formulation of the political programme, which is supposed to be the foundation of the conference, to a committee which is deliberating alone, without discussions in the provincial conferences or a deep dialogue and serious study to learn from the period from the 1993 Oslo agreement until today.

What is the value of the conferences if their main theme is not about discussing the condition of the national cause, how it can be salvaged, where do we stand, where do we want to get to and how can we accomplish what we want? Without such discussion, the conference will just be a battle over the division of shares and gains on the basis of re-producing exactly the same political approach.

This would still be the case even if the concluding communique of the conference were to include strongly worded sentences of the type that continue to be repeated year after year. Such statements are meaningless unless the conference is able do the following: define the relationship with Israel as one with an occupier and not with a peace partner; suspending security coordination, stating that recognising Israel should not be free of charge, and stressing that Palestinians will not remain in this condition for ever.

All these sentences will be empty and will only be for public consumption if they do not spring from profound conviction of the necessity of changing the course that has been pursued since Oslo.

Ending division

The first and foremost criterion for judging the seriousness of the Palestinian leadership is its position regarding the issue of division. Will it remain deadlocked in the cycle of blame and counter blame that shrouds the position of both sides? Each side has shown keenness to end the division and restore unity but according to its own interests and under its own leadership.

It will be impossible to initiate a comprehensive national dialogue, to revive the national liberation cause and restore the national project without closing the door on bilateral negotiations sponsored by the Americans 

So far, the president has not shown the minimum requirements needed for the success of the efforts aimed at ending the division between the factions. Instead, he has been heading in the direction of deepening the divisions, namely with the call for convening the old Palestine National Council without consultation and without forming a preparatory committee, not even with his own partners in the PLO. He announced through the media that the PNC would convene one month after the Fatah conference.

Going ahead with this call without participation from the rest of the factions, within and outside the PLO, and without expanding representation inside the Palestine National Council to include the youth, women and the representatives of civil society institutions, especially in light of the deteriorating Palestinian relations with the Arab Quartet, will not constitute a solution. It will only take us back to square one and turn the PLO into a faction and a party. In this case it would cease to be the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people as it used to be and as it should remain.

Unifying is not optional

The alternative is obvious. It begins with profound conviction that national unity and organising the management of disputes is a national necessity and not just one of the options. Without this, it will be impossible to accomplish anything that is in the interest of the Palestinians, whether in terms of peace or in terms of war.

Similarly, it will be impossible to initiate a comprehensive national dialogue, to revive the national liberation cause and restore the national project without closing the door on bilateral negotiations sponsored by the Americans or by some other international forum.

This revival must emanate from a conviction that it is impossible to accomplish the minimum level of Palestinian rights without serious and dedicated work to change the balance of power and force Israel to pay a heavy price for its aggressive, racist policy and for its occupation.

Rebuilding the PLO

Then comes rebuilding the PLO (and not reforming it because reform is neither sufficient nor attainable) so as to include the various colours of the political and social spectrum. This should be done on national and democratic foundations, through concord and real participation. After that comes the task of reconsidering the shape of the PA as well as its nature, functions and commitments. This will require the gradual dismantling of the Oslo structures and the transfer of the political tasks to the newly refounded PLO and thereby ending its current status as an agent of the occupation.

The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.

Image: Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas gestures as he gives a speech during a rally marking the 12th anniversary of the death of late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat in the West Bank city of Ramallah on November 10, 2016. (AFP)

 

http://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/fatah-conference-beginning-change-or-deepening-crisis-1207867594

 

Repost 0
Published by The Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
26 novembre 2016 6 26 /11 /novembre /2016 10:00
Israël veut museler les muezzins.

 

 

Et Taleb Abu Arar se mit à chanter.

 
" Allah est le plus grand... " La scène se passe à la tribune de la Knesset, le Parlement israélien. Le député bédouin, élu sur la Liste arabe unie, voulait ainsi marquer son opposition farouche, en ce 14 novembre, à un projet de loi sensible : le gouvernement a décidé de soutenir un texte visant à limiter le volume sonore des appels à la prière. L'islam n'est pas nommément visé par cette initiative, mais il n'y a guère de place pour le doute : ce sont bien les cinq appels quotidiens lancés par le muezzin, et relayés par les haut-parleurs, qui importunent la droite israélienne.

 

 

 
La question est particulièrement explosive à Jérusalem-Est, occupé au regard du droit international depuis 1967. Tout changement imposé par le législateur israélien dans les pratiques religieuses susciterait la colère populaire et celle de la Jordanie, qui régit les lieux saints musulmans. Selon Ayman Odeh, le chef de file de la Liste arabe unie à la Knesset, le texte est " une loi de plus dans une série de lois populistes et racistes dont le seul objectif est de créer une atmosphère de haine et d'incitations contre le public arabe ". Les Arabes israéliens représentent près de 20 % de la population totale du pays. Pour leur part, les promoteurs du projet de loi assurent qu'il n'a rien de raciste, mais vise à défendre la qualité de vie de centaines de milliers de citoyens concernés.
 

 

 

En ouverture du conseil des ministres, le 13 novembre, Benyamin Nétanyahou a défendu le texte. " Je ne peux compter les fois, tout simplement trop nombreuses, où des citoyens se sont adressés à moi de toutes les parties de la société israélienne, de toutes les religions, pour se plaindre du bruit et des souffrances causées par le bruit excessif venant jusqu'à eux en raison des adresses publiques en provenance des lieux de prière. " S'érigeant en défenseur de ceux qui " souffrent " de cette nuisance, le premier ministre a assuré que ce projet est d'une grande banalité. " C'est ainsi qu'on opère dans de nombreuses villes européennes et dans de nombreuses parties du monde musulman. "
 

 

 

Mais toutes les nuisances sonores sont-elles égales ? Deux jours plus tard, le ministre de la santé, Yaakov Litzman, chef du parti ultra-orthodoxe Judaïsme unifié de la Torah, a bloqué l'examen du projet de loi en demandant son renvoi devant le comité ministériel législatif. Les haredim sont inquiets de conséquences possibles sur leurs propres pratiques, et notamment la sirène utilisée dans leurs quartiers pour marquer le début du shabbat. " Depuis des milliers d'années, la tradition juive prévoit l'usage de différents outils, dont les shofars - instrument de musique à vent traditionnel -  et les trompettes ", a souligné le ministre. Depuis son intervention, le gouvernement étudie la possibilité d'une exception dans la loi pour ce cas particulier.

 

 

 

L'idée de réduire le volume des appels à la prière  chez les musulmans n'est pas nouvelle. Elle a été lancée fin 2011 par une sulfureuse députée nationaliste, Anastassia Michaeli. " Il n'y a pas de raison d'être plus libéral que l'Europe ", avait alors expliqué, en soutien, Benyamin Nétanyahou, tandis que bon nombre de ses ministres, appartenant à sa formation (Likoud), trouvaient l'initiative excessive. À l'époque, le quotidien Haaretz (centre gauche) notait que le premier ministre, qui dispose d'une résidence familiale dans la ville côtière de Césarée, était très sensibilisé à la question. Une partie des habitants se mobilisait alors contre les appels à la prière lancés dans le village voisin de Jisr Al-Zarqa. Le projet de loi est revenu dans le débat en 2014, soutenu par un collègue d'Anastassia Michaeli, Robert Ilatov, également élu sur la liste du parti d'extrême droite Yisrael Beiteinu. " J'ai honte qu'on essaie de passer de telles lois ",avait dit le président de l'époque, Shimon Peres. Les temps ont bien changé.

 

Piotr Smolar

 

 

Repost 0
Published by Le Monde.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
25 novembre 2016 5 25 /11 /novembre /2016 10:19
Israël active un projet de colonisation pour la 1re fois depuis Trump
 
 
 
 
Modifié le - Publié le | AFP

    Envoyer l'article à un ami
     
    Israël active un projet de colonisation pour la 1re fois depuis Trump

    Merci d'avoir partagé cet article avec vos amis

    Merci de compléter ce formulaire

    Message en cas d'erreur au focus sur le champ
     
    Ajouter aux favoris
     

    Cet article a été ajouté dans vos favoris.

     
    Repost 0
    Published by Le Point.fr / AFP - dans Revue de presse
    commenter cet article
    25 novembre 2016 5 25 /11 /novembre /2016 10:16
    350 Palestinian minors held in Israeli jails: NGO
     
     
     
     
     
    Palestinian minor captured by Israel [file photo]
     
    Palestinian minor captured by Israel [file photo]
     
     
     

    At least 350 Palestinian children are languishing in Israeli jails, a local Palestinian NGO said Saturday.

    “Israeli authorities are holding 350 Palestinian children aged between 12 and 18,” the Palestinian Prisoners Society said in a statement on the occasion of the UN Universal Children’s Day.

    It said twelve females were among jailed children in Israeli prisons.

    According to the NGO, more than 2,000 Palestinian minors have been detained by Israeli forces since 2015.

    “Israel has committed several violations against Palestinian children, including firing live ammunition against them, detaining them and [keeping them] without food and water in addition to beating and intimidation,” it said.

    The NGO cited that Israeli investigators used threats to extract confessions from Palestinian children.

    It said some Palestinian children were slapped with life sentences by Israeli courts, while others were sentenced to 10 years in prison.

    The NGO went on to call on international organisations, particularly the UNICEF, to intervene to protect Palestinian children in Israeli prisons.

    According to Palestinian official figures, more than 7,000 Palestinians are currently held in detention facilities throughout Israel.

     

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20161120-350-palestinian-minors-held-in-israeli-jails-ngo/

    Repost 0
    Published by The Middle East Eye.com - dans Revue de presse
    commenter cet article
    25 novembre 2016 5 25 /11 /novembre /2016 10:15
    350 Palestinian minors held in Israeli jails: NGO
     
     
     
     
     
    Palestinian minor captured by Israel [file photo]
     
    Palestinian minor captured by Israel [file photo]
     
     
     

    At least 350 Palestinian children are languishing in Israeli jails, a local Palestinian NGO said Saturday.

    “Israeli authorities are holding 350 Palestinian children aged between 12 and 18,” the Palestinian Prisoners Society said in a statement on the occasion of the UN Universal Children’s Day.

    It said twelve females were among jailed children in Israeli prisons.

    According to the NGO, more than 2,000 Palestinian minors have been detained by Israeli forces since 2015.

    “Israel has committed several violations against Palestinian children, including firing live ammunition against them, detaining them and [keeping them] without food and water in addition to beating and intimidation,” it said.

    The NGO cited that Israeli investigators used threats to extract confessions from Palestinian children.

    It said some Palestinian children were slapped with life sentences by Israeli courts, while others were sentenced to 10 years in prison.

    The NGO went on to call on international organisations, particularly the UNICEF, to intervene to protect Palestinian children in Israeli prisons.

    According to Palestinian official figures, more than 7,000 Palestinians are currently held in detention facilities throughout Israel.

     

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20161120-350-palestinian-minors-held-in-israeli-jails-ngo/

    Repost 0
    Published by The Middle East Eye.com - dans Revue de presse
    commenter cet article
    24 novembre 2016 4 24 /11 /novembre /2016 07:22

    Le projet « LAW-TRAIN » Un partenariat avec la police israélienne est indéfendable

     

      Dossier BACBI n° 2 (FR)

    | BACBI |Rapports

    Dans le cadre de l’Accord d’association entre l’Union européenne et Israël, [1] les institutions et entreprises israéliennes bénéficient d’un accès privilégié aux programmes pluriannuels européens de recherche et d’innovation. Israël a bien pris conscience des avantages énormes qu’il peut tirer de cette coopération portant sur de longues années. [2] Le programme en cours, « Horizon 2020 », budgétise des projets pour un montant total de plus de 77 milliards d’euros.

    Le projet « LAW-TRAIN » constitue l’un des projets dans lesquels des institutions et entreprises européennes collaborent avec des homologues israéliens. [3] Il est coordonné par l’Université de Bar-Ilan, avec la collaboration du ministère israélien de la Sécurité publique et de la Police nationale israélienne. [4] Parmi les partenaires européens, en sus de quelques entreprises privées, nous trouvons aussi le Ministère Espagnol de l’Intérieur / la Guardia Civil et le Ministère Portugais de la Justice / la Police Portugaise en tant que partenaires. Les autorités portugaises ont toutefois fait savoir fin août qu’elles se retiraient du projet. [5] Du côté belge, y prennent part : le Service public fédéral Justice, de même que, en tant que seule université européenne, la Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven). [6] Le projet vise au développement de « méthodes d’interrogatoire transculturel et de modules de formation s’appuyant sur la recherche multiculturelle en criminologie » ; pour la formation, un « système d’interrogatoire virtuel » sera développé. [7]

    Avec le présent dossier, nous voulons attirer l’attention sur le contexte élargi au sein duquel il convient d’évaluer ce projet européen coordonné par Israël. Ce contexte recouvre de nombreuses années de violations par Israël du droit international et des droits de l’homme de la population autochtone. Les services de police et de sécurité israéliens, associés à l’armée d’occupation, jouent un rôle prépondérant dans ce système d’oppression. Dans les pages qui suivent, nous nous concentrerons sur ce que cela signifie concrètement dans la routine policière, un quotidien fait de répression, d’arrestations, d’incarcérations et d’interrogatoires de suspects. [8]

    PS 1 : En vue de la rédaction de ce dossier nous avons fait appel au dossier (succinct mais) excellent rédigé par Stop the Wall : « LAWTRAIN : European license for Israeli torture » (LAW-TRAIN : Torture israélienne sous licence européenne ).

    PS 2 : Pour les adresses Internet des rapports des organisations des droits de l’homme qui ont été consultés, ainsi que celles de nombre de conventions internationales, le lecteur est prié de consulter les listes qui figurent à la fin du présent dossier.

    PS 3 : Pour les références citées dans les notes et listes en fin de dossier, nous avons mentionné la date de consultation. Une exception : les articles publiés cette année.

    Table des matières

    • Prologue : p. 2
    • Arrestation et incarcération : p. 3
    • Régime pénitentiaire et interrogatoire : p. 17
    • « Bar-Ilan is all security » : p. 23
    • « Ethics Check » : p. 29
    • Conclusions : p. 32
    • Associations de droits de l’homme : Rapports : p. 33
    • Conventions internationales : p. 38
    Repost 0
    Published by AURDIP.org - dans Revue de presse
    commenter cet article