Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
25 juin 2016 6 25 /06 /juin /2016 02:37

Let’s not be overly optimistic about an imminent demise of IS

Menwer Masalmeh

Tuesday 21 June 2016 12:45 UTC

The strategies employed to fight IS will undermine the group temporarily, but as long as sectarian ethnic forces are involved, it will re-emerge

Two years ago, the whole world woke up to the news that the so-called Islamic State (IS) had seized Iraq’s second largest city of Mosul in a shocking defeat for the Iraqi army. The principal strategy of IS was based on shows of strength and the seizure of territory over which it imposed its authority. Having done this, IS was in a position to declare an Islamic caliphate straddling Syria and Iraq by the end of June 2014.

As a result of this seismic shift in the geopolitics of the Middle East region, an international coalition under American leadership was announced to eliminate IS. But after two years of the organisation's ascendency, question marks hang over the US-led strategy to confront and eliminate IS.

The seed of sectarianism is still in the ground

The US-led coalition has depended, by and large, on military force as the main instrument to fight IS. Undoubtedly, the territorial expansion of Islamic State has been halted, as the organisation has lost significant territory, including strategic towns and cities. In addition, the offensive capabilities of the organisation, previously seen as formidable, have been undermined by a series of defeats and setbacks. Instead, it has moved into a defensive position.

Despite the relative success of the anti-IS forces in the military field, however, the methods being used in these operations makes failure a likely outcome. While sectarianism and persecution of Sunnis in Iraq was one of the major reasons that led to the emergence of IS, the international coalition has turned a blind eye to the risks of including sectarian elements in the ad hoc anti-IS alliance. This omission will only serve to further ignite the region, by planting the seeds for more sectarian in-fighting and instability.

This has already been seen in the victorious offensives to take back Fallujah from IS led by the Iraqi army. Not only has the professionalism of the Iraqi army been seriously questioned, it is also supported by the controversial participation of the Popular Mobilisation Units (PMUs) under Iranian supervision. Since the start of the latest military offensive three weeks ago, and even when the confrontations were still on the outskirts of the city, sectarian killings have been taking place. For instance, Shia militias have committed sectarian cleansing against Sunni civilians after accusing them of supporting IS.

The Iraqi government, backed by the international coalition and Shia militias, recaptured most of the major centres held by IS such as Tikrit, Bayji and Ramadi - leaving only Mosul city still under IS control.

Many expect an imminent end for IS following this series of defeats on the ground. After the battle for Fallujah, all the forces will likely meet for a potentially decisive battle for Mosul, considered IS's capital in Iraq. But will victory in this battle mean that IS is definitively uprooted from the region?

This is unlikely, because tackling a phenomenon using methods that in themselves caused the phenomenon in the first place is doomed to failure. If matters continue as they have until now, without a just settlement for all sects, extremist sectarian groups will rise from the ashes of any military defeat of IS. In retrospect, it is obvious that the Sunni crisis was steadily intensifying as US forces pulled out until 2013 at which point IS emerged, presenting itself as the protector of Sunnis.

IS exploited the persecution of Sunnis and the encroachment of Shia groups supervised by Iranian advisors. Although IS didn’t have the support of the majority of Sunnis, it at least secured their neutrality since many saw the extremism of IS as a counter force to the prejudice of the government and its allies. As long as sectarian-based policies continue, extremism will likely surface again under different names, organisations and sects.

Kurdish militants are not the key

In Syria, initial US support for the Syrian opposition’s demands for a future without President Bashar al-Assad have been downgraded as fighting IS became America’s strategic priority. Because the international coalition’s mission didn’t extend to boots on the ground, and the opposition remained committed to fighting the Assad regime, this meant that - unlike in Iraq - there was no conventional ground force to take the fight to IS.

The US’s failure to find a solid ally on the ground led to an American-Kurdish alliance. The Syrian Kurdish militants, under the leadership of the Democratic Union Party (PYD), have an identical vision to America’s, that defeating IS must take priority over removing the Assad regime. In addition, Syrian Kurds found this alliance an opportunity to ease the way to their own long-awaited state.

The clear progress of this alliance was seen in the northern strip of the Syrian border with Turkey. Defeating IS in these territories cut off the gateway through which foreign fighters came to join IS. But it is questionable to what extent Kurdish militants can be a real threat to IS in Syria and continue to achieve victories. The answer is not much.

The Kurds battling in the northern towns have sought to change the demographic balance by moving Kurds into these areas. Kicking IS out is a necessary step to protect the Kurdish population and establish a Kurdish state. To be precise, they fight in their lands amid the residents’ welcome and support, but this is not the case in Arab-populated cities, like Raqqa, where people are apprehensive about ethnic cleansing.

The suspicions over Kurdish forces have due cause, since for the Kurds to achieve the dream of their own state they have carried out ethnic cleansing against Arabs. In order to create a continuous geographic unity for the perceived state, the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) have evicted Arabs and Turkmen and committed killings in the northern suburbs of al-Hasakah such as Qamishli and Tell Hamees. These actions have caused a societal cleavage, and thwart the possibilities of forming a stable alliance on the ground to end IS rule.

The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a nascent alliance which includes mainstream of Kurds and a modest participation of Arabs, is an example of how ethnic fears still overshadow relationships. A report in the Guardian newspaper exposed the mistrust amongst SDF fighters and the marginalisation of Arabs in the ongoing battle to take Manbij from IS.

A recapture of Raqqa, the stronghold of IS in Syria, will demand a more effective force than Kurdish militants. Like Mosul in Iraq, the city is still in IS hands despite the great power of anti-IS forces surrounding it. It is better to reconsider the approach in Syria, instead of gambling on ethnic units which would most likely muddy the waters.

IS not Russia's main target

The Russian intervention in Syria came to the rescue of Assad’s government, which was on the verge of collapse last summer. Russia didn’t only target IS in its air assaults, but included any group that “looks like a terrorist, walks like a terrorist,"as Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said. In plain English, this intervention was designed to smash the opposition forces in the western part of Syria more than IS, and that actually has come to pass.

Put simply, the Assad leadership is keen to keep IS on the Syrian scene because it knows the West prioritises defeating IS over Assad’s removal. As long as IS remains a threat, Assad knows the West will not come after him. It is no surprise that Assad’s forces have coordinated clandestinely with IS, as is shown in documents exposed by Sky News revealing what took place during the battle of Palmyra. Russia realises that the existence of IS provides a lifeline to the Syrian regime. It would be frivolous to assume that the Russian intervention might put an end to IS in Syria.

The defective strategies being employed to fight IS will undoubtedly weaken its military capabilities for a short time, but by using sectarian and ethnic forces in this fight, the anti-IS alliance is making the return of IS, and its offspring, inevitable.

-Menwer Masalmeh is a Palestinian journalist based in the UK, writes about Middle East affairs. You can follow him on Twitter @MinwerMasalmeh.

The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.

Photo: Iraqi pro-government forces hold an Islamic State (IS) group flag in the al-Dhubat II (Officers) neighbourhood of Fallujah as they try to clear the city of IS fighters still holed up in the former militant bastion on 19 June, 2016 (AFP).

http://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/let-s-not-be-overly-optimistic-about-imminent-demise-1954169123

Repost 0
Published by The Middle East Eye.net - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
24 juin 2016 5 24 /06 /juin /2016 02:42

Abbas accuse les rabbins de vouloir empoisonner les puits palestiniens, Israël crie à la calomnie

© Thierry Charlier, AFP | S'exprimant devant le Parlement européen jeudi 23 juin, le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas a déclaré que des rabbins avaient demandé au gouvernement d'empoisonner l'eau des puits pour tuer des Palestiniens.

Texte par FRANCE 24

Dernière modification : 23/06/2016

Israël accuse Mahmoud Abbas d'avoir calomnié les juifs. Le président palestinien a déclaré devant le Parlement européen que certains rabbins avaient appelé à empoisonner l'eau des puits pour tuer des Palestiniens.

S'exprimant devant le Parlement européen jeudi 23 juin, le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas a affrimé que récemment, "un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d'empoisonner l'eau pour tuer les Palestiniens". De la calomnie contre les juifs, selon Israël.

"Abou Mazen a montré son vrai visage à Bruxelles", a déclaré dans un communiqué le bureau du Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahou, utilisant le nom de guerre de Mahmoud Abbas.

Sans citer de sources à ces accusations, Mahmoud Abbas a également ajouté que cet appel entrait dans le cadre d'attaques qualifiées par lui d'incitation à la violence contre les Palestiniens.

Confusion autour d'une éventuelle rencontre entre présidents palestinien et israélien

Dans le même temps, le président du Parlement européen Martin Schulz n'a pas réussi à organiser comme il le souhaitait une rencontre entre Mahmoud Abbas et le président israélien Reuven Rivlin, qui se trouvait également à Bruxelles jeudi.

Martin Schulz a indiqué à l'AFP qu'"il n'y a pas eu de rencontre en raison d'une incompatibilité d'agendas". Mais Reuven Rivlin a pour sa part rejeté la responsabilité de l'échec de cette tentative de rencontre sur le président palestinien.

"Personnellement, je trouve cela étrange que le président Abbas (...) refuse toujours de rencontrer des dirigeants israéliens et se tourne toujours vers la communauté internationale pour trouver de l'aide", a-t-il lancé, en faisant allusion à l'initiative française de conférence de paix internationale, à laquelle s'oppose fermement Israël.

De son côté, le porte-parole de Mahmoud Abbas, Nabil Abou Roudeina, a démenti que toute rencontre ait été prévue.

Selon le bureau de Benjamin Netanyahou, ce qui s'est passé à Bruxelles contredit la volonté affichée de Mahmoud Abbas de négocier la paix avec Israël. "La personne qui refuse de rencontrer le président (israélien) et énonce des calomnies devant le Parlement européen ment lorsqu'il prétend que sa main est tendue pour faire la paix", selon le communiqué.

Avec AFP

Première publication : 23/06/2016

http://www.france24.com/fr/20160623-israel-accuse-abbas-calomnie-juifs-eau-puits-empoisonner-palestiniens-netanyahou

Repost 0
Published by France24.com / AFP - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
24 juin 2016 5 24 /06 /juin /2016 02:40

Tel-Aviv inonde les colons et assèche les territoires occupés

Stéphane Aubouard

Mardi, 21 Juin, 2016

L'Humanité

AFP

Le gouvernement israélien a octroyé, hier, 16 millions d’euros aux colons après avoir coupé l’eau aux Palestiniens de Cisjordanie.
L’effet Avigdor Lieberman ne s’est pas fait attendre en Israël.
Trois semaines après sa désignation comme ministre de la Défense au sein du gouvernement Netanyahou, le leader du mouvement d’extrême droite Israel Beytenou (« Israël notre maison ») a su redurcir un gouvernement israélien déjà fort ossifié mais qu’il jugeait « trop mou » ces derniers mois dans sa gestion du cas palestinien.
Depuis dix jours, toutes les armes – militaires, monétaires, hydriques ou politiques – sont braquées sur les Palestiniens.
Pour preuves : le 10 juin, l’armée israélienne boucle la Cisjordanie et la bande de Gaza, en représailles à l’attentat qui avait coûté la vie à quatre Israéliens le mercredi précédent à Tel-Aviv. L’ONU dénonce alors « une punition collective ».
Le lendemain, l’armée détruit la maison familiale d’un adolescent palestinien accusé d’avoir tué en janvier une Israélienne en Cisjordanie occupée.
Mercredi dernier, la municipalité de Jérusalem approuve la construction d’un immeuble destiné aux colons juifs à Silwan, un quartier de Jérusalem-Est où vivent 50 000 Palestiniens.
En début de semaine dernière, c’est la compagnie nationale des eaux israélienne, Mekorot, qui autorise des coupures d’eau dans les territoires en plein mois de ramadan et au plus fort de la canicule. « Les gens doivent acheter de l’eau aux camions-citernes, ou s’approvisionner à des sources », déclare à Al Djazira Ayman Rabi, un hydrologue palestinien.
À Jénine, ville de 40 000 habitants, la mairie annonce que l’approvisionnement en eau a été divisé par deux.
Les villes de Salfit et Naplouse (120 000 habitants) auraient également subi des ruptures d’approvisionnement.
Dans le plus grand silence de la communauté internationale, la députée fédérale PS belge Gwenaëlle Grovonius a condamné ce jeudi cette stratégie du pire au Parlement belge. « L’eau est accaparée par les autorités israéliennes.
Dans ce contexte, il n’y a aucune chance pour le processus de paix.
Il est urgent que notre gouvernement arrête ses atermoiements et que la Belgique prenne enfin toute sa place pour faire en sorte de mettre fin à cette occupation qui a duré depuis trop longtemps », a-t-elle déclaré.
En vain. Dimanche, la Knesset a voté une « aide spéciale » de 16 millions d’euros aux colonies de Cisjordanie occupée, pour répondre à une « détérioration de la sécurité » des colons. « C’est notre devoir de renforcer les localités qui sont en première ligne dans la lutte contre le terrorisme et affrontent avec héroïsme les défis sécuritaires et sociaux complexes de cette situation », a déclaré le ministre des Affaires sociales israélien Haim Katz.
De son côté, le numéro deux de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine (OLP), Saeb Erekat, a accusé Israël de faire « tout ce qu’il faut pour saboter toute chance d’arriver à la paix ».

http://www.humanite.fr/tel-aviv-inonde-les-colons-et-asseche-les-territoires-occupes-610078

Repost 0
Published by L'Humanité.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
24 juin 2016 5 24 /06 /juin /2016 02:38

Russie-Israël, l’alliance qui n’existait pas

Orient XXI > Magazine > Igor Delanoë > 23 juin 2016

Le premier ministre israélien Benyamin Nétanyahou s’est rendu en visite officielle à Moscou le 7 juin dernier afin de prendre part avec Vladimir Poutine aux célébrations du 25e anniversaire du rétablissement des relations diplomatiques entre Israël et la Russie. Tout dynamique qu’il puisse paraître, le partenariat israélo-russe reste cependant insuffisant pour sceller une authentique alliance entre Moscou et Tel-Aviv.

en.kremlin.ru, 2012.

La récente visite du premier ministre israélien à Moscou — qu’il a qualifiée lui-même d’« historique » — est le troisième déplacement effectué par Benyamin Nétanyahou dans la capitale russe depuis septembre 2015. Le chef de l’État israélien et Vladimir Poutine s’étaient déjà rencontrés à Paris en marge de la Conférence sur le climat (COP21), fin 2015. Israël a très rapidement intégré le paramètre russe dans son équation sécuritaire, et a été le premier État à mettre au point avec Moscou des mesures dites de « déconfliction » permettant d’éviter des incidents entre forces aériennes israéliennes et russes. En pratique, des appareils russes ont à plusieurs reprises pénétré l’espace aérien israélien sans que toutefois cela ne provoque leur destruction. Pour Tel-Aviv, le « nouveau voisin » russe établi militairement en Syrie fait figure de nation amie avec laquelle il convient de traiter de façon pragmatique, car Moscou a forgé à l’occasion de sa campagne en Syrie une alliance militaire de circonstance avec l’Iran, et indirectement, avec le Hezbollah. L’ambivalence du positionnement russe a été illustrée lors de l’assassinat de Samir Kuntar, un responsable libanais de la milice chiite, éliminé à Damas lors d’un raid aérien en décembre 2015 et plus récemment par celui de Moustapha Badreddine, un chef militaire du Hezbollah tué par un « obus » le 13 mai 2016, également à Damas. Ces opérations auraient été menées par l’État israélien sans que — fait troublant — cela n’ait causé d’interférences, ni avec l’aviation russe ni avec les systèmes sol-air basés par Moscou sur le sol syrien, dont les S-400.

Coopération bilatérale au beau fixe

Les relations bilatérales israélo-russes font état d’un bilan très positif depuis leur rétablissement en 1991, après vingt-quatre ans d’une rupture initiée par l’URSS en 1967 suite au déclenchement de la guerre de juin 1967 par Israël. Au plan économique, les échanges commerciaux entre les deux pays ont connu un bond spectaculaire, passant de 12 millions de dollars en 1991 à près de 2,3 milliards en 2015. Toutefois, le commerce bilatéral s’essouffle ces deux dernières années et peine à retrouver la croissance continue qui le caractérisait entre 2010 et 2013. En 2015, les échanges commerciaux israélo-russes s’établissent à 2,3 milliards de dollars, soit une diminution de plus de 30 % par rapport à 2014 (3,4 milliards de dollars), ramenant leur niveau approximativement à celui de 2010 (2,5 milliards de dollars). Les exportations russes ont été notamment divisées par deux, passant de 1,5 milliard de dollars (2014) à 800 millions (2015).

Afin de relancer leur commerce bilatéral, Russes et Israéliens souhaitent solliciter de nouveaux ressorts de croissance, parmi lesquels l’établissement d’une zone de libre-échange entre Israël et l’Union économique eurasiatique (UEEA) offre des perspectives prometteuses. L’accord de principe politique existe entre les parties et comme l’a indiqué le ministre israélien de l’agriculture Uri Ariel lors de sa visite à Moscou en février dernier, un document pourrait être signé d’ici fin 2016. La dernière visite de Benyamin Nétanyahou a par ailleurs été l’occasion de signer un accord permettant d’élargir le reversement de retraites russes aux citoyens israéliens issus de la Russie ex-soviétique et ne détenant pas la double nationalité. Ce dispositif porterait à 100 000 le nombre de personnes bénéficiant de cette mesure en Israël, contre 30 000 qui perçoivent déjà aujourd’hui une retraite de la part de l’État russe.

La Russie voit aussi dans Israël un fournisseur de haute technologie ainsi qu’un partenaire privilégié pour le développement de son secteur agricole dans le cadre de la politique de substitutions aux importations mise en œuvre par le Kremlin depuis la crise ukrainienne. La dernière visite de Nétanyahou a donné lieu à cet égard à la signature d’une série de mémorandums portant sur la coopération dans le domaine de l’agriculture et de l’élevage. De plus, des experts israéliens contribueraient au projet d’avion civil moyen-courrier développé par Irkout — le MS-21 — dont le premier exemplaire a été présenté le 8 juin dernier à Irkoutsk. Toujours en matière de haute technologie, Israël aide depuis 2009 la Russie à ressusciter son industrie des drones. Une série de contrats portant sur l’achat, le transfert de technologies et la localisation de la production de drones à Ekaterinbourg ont été signés au cours des sept dernières années pour un montant total de 900 millions de dollars.

Un partenariat stratégique pour Israël

Au mois d’avril 2016, alors que le processus de résolution de la crise syrienne était lancé à Genève sous le patronage des Américains et des Russes, Benyamin Nétanyahou déclarait qu’Israël « ne rendrait jamais le plateau du Golan à la Syrie » moins de trois jours après avoir rencontré Vladimir Poutine à Moscou. Cette visite, intervenue à quelques heures d’une réunion inattendue du cabinet israélien sur le Golan avait probablement pour objectif d’évoquer cette question avec le président russe et de s’assurer notamment qu’elle ne ferait pas l’objet de discussions lors des pourparlers de Genève sur la Syrie. Pour Tel-Aviv, la Russie entre dans une logique de diversification des partenariats stratégiques qui vise non pas à remplacer l’alliance avec Washington mais à pallier les conséquences des divergences survenues avec l’administration Obama au sujet du Proche-Orient, notamment vis-à-vis de l’Iran. Israël soigne d’autant plus sa relation avec la Russie qu’il reste par ailleurs préoccupé par la teneur de la coopération militaro-technique entre Moscou et Téhéran, par exemple sur la livraison des systèmes sol-air S-300 à laquelle la Russie a finalement accédé après de longues tergiversations, ainsi que par les livraisons d’armements russes au régime syrien dont les Israéliens craignent qu’une partie ne finisse entre les mains du Hezbollah.

Les relations israélo-russes n’ont pas pâti de la discrète amélioration des liens entre Ankara et Tel-Aviv constatée depuis l’automne dernier que les Israéliens présentent prudemment comme un développement relevant d’un agenda parallèle totalement déconnecté de la détérioration des relations russo-turques. Il s’agit pour Israël de ménager le partenaire russe, et, pourquoi pas, de tenter une délicate médiation entre la Russie et la Turquie à laquelle il pourrait contribuer, fort d’une expérience relativement similaire. La construction prévue de deux nouvelles tranches à la centrale nucléaire de Bouchehr par Rosatom, et l’intensification de la coopération militaro-technique russo-iranienne suite à la levée des sanctions qui pesaient sur Téhéran constituent toutefois des dossiers épineux pour la relation russo-israélienne.

Moscou s’avère néanmoins un interlocuteur précieux pour Israël sur le dossier du règlement du conflit israélo-palestinien. Le Quartet international pour le Proche-Orient (ONU, Union européenne, Russie, États-Unis) prépare un rapport portant sur l’état d’avancement du processus de paix qui irrite déjà le gouvernement israélien, peu enclin à laisser des acteurs étrangers s’ingérer dans ce qu’il considère relever de ses affaires internes. Israël compte certainement sur le fait que Moscou, en tant que membre du Quartet et du Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU, contribuera à nuancer — si ce n’est à bloquer — certaines initiatives, « renvoyant l’ascenseur » à Israël qui s’est abstenu de voter une résolution présentée par les États-Unis le 27 mars 2014 aux Nations unies condamnant l’annexion de la Crimée par la Russie.

Le facteur russe continue de polariser au sein de la société israélienne. Selon une étude réalisée en 2015, près de 74 % des Israéliens auraient ainsi une image négative de la Russie. Cette image dégradée s’expliquerait avant tout par des causes internes : la forte « américanisation » de la société en Israël, le vote très à droite des Russes israéliens, et l’idée selon laquelle l’immigration des russophones aurait été porteuse de vices et de corruption (prostitution, jeux d’argent…). Au demeurant, le récent retour au sein du gouvernement israélien d’un des « produits » de cette immigration russophone, Avigdor Lieberman, nommé ministre de la défense en mai 2016, reste une bonne nouvelle pour les relations israélo-russes.

Igor Delanoë

Igor Delanoë

Directeur adjoint de l’Observatoire franco-russe (Moscou), docteur en histoire, spécialiste des questions de politique étrangère et de défense russes.

Soutenez Orient XXI

Orient XXI est un média indépendant, gratuit et sans publicité, vous pouvez faire un don défiscalisé en ligne, ou par chèque :

Je soutiens Orient XXI

http://orientxxi.info/magazine/russie-israel-l-alliance-qui-n-existait-pas,1379
Repost 0
Published by OrientXXI.info - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
24 juin 2016 5 24 /06 /juin /2016 02:37

Israeli troops 'mistakenly' kill Palestinian teenager

Military says 15-year-old died and four others were wounded in West Bank after soldiers mistook them for stone-throwers

Israeli troops have shot dead a 15-year-old Palestinian boy as he travelled home from a family outing, after opening fire in response to stone-throwing in which the boy had not been involved.

A preliminary investigation by the Israeli military found that the car the boy was travelling in had been “mistakenly hit” as the soldiers chased Palestinian stone throwers who had injured an Israeli bus passenger and two tourists in another vehicle. The shooting near the village of Beit Sira was angrily condemned by the Palestinian leadership in Ramallah.

The military said that at around 1am firebombs and rocks had been thrown and oil spilled on to the busy Route 443 between Jerusalem and Modi’in. The road, which is often used as an alternative route between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, cuts through the occupied West Bank where it is overlooked at points by Palestinian villages.

The Palestinian Authority, who named the dead boy as Mahmoud Rafat Badran, from the village of Beit-Uhr-Eh-Tahta, said that three other Palestinians also injured were treated at a medical centre in Ramallah, and a fourth wounded person had been taken to Israel for treatment.

The Israeli newspaper Haaretz quoted the boy’s father as saying that Rafat was travelling back with relatives, including the boy’s aunt, from a trip to a swimming pool in Beit Sira that had started after the fast-breaking Ramadan evening meal.

The road they had taken goes through an underpass under Route 443, he said, adding: “As they approached the passage, a car stood on the bridge, next to a man with a gun who opened fire on the vehicle. As far as I could understand, some of the passengers jumped out of the vehicle and some remained inside, and were hit, including my son who was very seriously wounded and died a short time later.“

This was indiscriminate gunfire with the intent to kill and I demand that this incident be judged by the world court,” Badran said. Saeb Erekat, general secretary of the Palestinian Liberation Organisation, said that the boy had been “murdered” in a “cold-blooded assassination” as he was returning “from the only nearby swimming pool”.

The Israeli Defence Forces said: “Overnight, three civilians were injured after a number of Palestinians hurled rocks and Molotov cocktails at moving vehicles near the village of Beit Sira on Route 443.

“Nearby forces acted in order to protect additional passing vehicles from immediate danger and fired towards suspects. From the initial inquiry it appears that uninvolved bystanders were mistakenly hit during the pursuit. The IDF is investigating the circumstances.”

New measures pushed through last year by the prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, gave the security forces much greater latitude to use live ammunition against Palestinians throwing stones and firebombs. A minimum three-year jail sentence was later introduced for stone-throwers.

The Israeli military also yesterday demolished the home in the West Bank village of Hajjah of a Palestinian, Bashar Masallha, who killed an American tourist and wounded 10 Israelis in a stabbing attack in Tel Aviv in March.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/21/israeli-troops-mistakenly-kill-palestinian-teenager-stone-throwers

Repost 0
Published by The Guardian.com (UK) - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2016 4 23 /06 /juin /2016 02:40

Palestine: l'archéologie au secours de la mémoire

Une équipe française d’archéologie révèle les vestiges oubliés de la Palestine et sensibilise les Palestiniens à leur histoire.
Nicolas Ropert, France Inter, mercredi 22 juin 2016
>>Ecouter l’émission
Nous sommes en Palestine et vous venez d’entendre Bertrand Riba, un archéologue français qui travaille pour l’Institut Français du Proche-Orient. Il dirige une équipe de quatre Français et de neuf Palestiniens qui fouillent dans la région d’Hébron, dans le sud de la Cisjordanie. Les vestiges, vieux de 15 siècles, se trouveraient à l’endroit décrit dans la Bible où Saint Jean-Baptiste a réalisé ses premiers baptêmes. Mais travailler dans les territoires palestiniens occupés par Israël est un combat de tous les jours. Le correspondant de France Inter et RFI en Cisjordanie, Nicolas Ropert leur a rendu visite.
En contre-bas du village palestinien de Taffouh, l’équipe retourne délicatement la terre avec des pioches et des truelles. Sandrine Bert Geith, archéologue franco-suisse, montre un petit morceau trouvé dans le sol.
Le site n’a pas été fouillé depuis la fin des années 1940. Il est plutôt bien conservé mais l’occupation israélienne complique le travail des archéologues, confie Bertrand Riba.
Malgré tout, ces fouilles menées conjointement avec le ministère palestinien du tourisme et des antiquités permettent de sensibiliser les palestiniens à leur histoire. Étudiant en marketing, Basheer Fisal Khamasy, n’avait jamais participé à une telle expédition.
C’est la première fois que je fais ce travail. Ça me plait beaucoup. On fait du beau boulot et ce n’est pas très difficile. La Palestine a beaucoup de vestiges comme ceux-là parce que c’est une région chargée d’histoire. Donc il faut en prendre soin. Les palestiniens l’ont compris ici.

https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/ailleurs/ailleurs-22-juin-2016

Repost 0
Published by franceinter.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2016 4 23 /06 /juin /2016 02:39

Understanding, but no peace for Palestinian and Israeli students in UK

@ian_black

Monday 20 June 2016 13.09 BST

City University’s pioneering Olive Tree programme helped bridge the narrative divide for young scholars from the harsh front lines of the Middle East. Now the cash ha

On the face of it, it was just another end-of-term party: wine, fruit juice and crisps under a screen showing jokey videos of course highlights and affectionate tributes to teachers. Outside the London pubs were buzzing at the end of a summer day. But there was music in Arabic, chatter in Hebrew and fond farewells from students from the front lines of the world’s most intractable conflict.

In the 12 years since the launch of the Olive Tree scholarship programme 58 Palestinians and Israelis have graduated from City University – their degree studies supplemented by dialogue, interaction and debate. On top of the routine challenges of student life they have had to deal with terrible distractions: two days earlier Palestinian gunmen had shot dead four Israelis in the heart of Tel Aviv and the entire occupied West Bank was sealed off.

Other low points were three wars over Gaza (the last one, in 2014, killed 2,100 Palestinians, many of them civilians, and 66 Israeli soldiers) and another between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon. Yet throughout them the students attended classes together, shared apartments and reached out across the Middle Eastern divide in a unique environment that – most agree - enabled them to better understand the conflict that has shaped their lives. Back home most would probably never have met.s run out.

“The programme provided us with a special space that neither Israeli nor Palestinian could experience in the region,” was the conclusion of Stav Shaffir, who graduated from City in sociology and journalism 2009 and is now a celebrated social activist and the youngest member of the Knesset in Jerusalem.

Ahmed, born to Palestinian refugee parents in Libya and raised in Nablus, studied engineering in the first cohort, and, like several other former students, has been able to stay on in London. He is certain he benefitted from being able to talk to the enemy. “Everyone was able to listen to each other,” he says. “I gained a tremendous amount of knowledge, though I still don’t know how to resolve the conflict.” He remains good friends with Gilad, who runs a Tel Aviv radio station.

“The Olive Tree changed my life,” the Israeli says, joking that the worst problem with Ahmed and a second Palestinian flatmate was that they were both heavy smokers and wouldn’t do the washing up. “We were all radicalised - in a good way: that means relying on politics in a way that can make an impact.”

Many argue that the real value of the experience was prolonged exposure to the other side - not the fleeting, inevitably charged encounters of brief dialogues run by well-meaning intermediaries. There is little talk of solutions: “It’s not about peace, too simple, too sure/ It’s about journey and depth and the will to endure” - goes a poem penned in the programme’s honour.

Haneen, graduating with a politics degree this summer, is a Palestinian citizen of Israel who speaks fluent Hebrew. So for this 22 year-old the chief novelty was meeting not Jews but fellow Palestinians from Gaza, shut off from their compatriots by a decade long-blockade that has helped keep Hamas in power. “If all Israelis were like my classmates things would be easier,” she reflects. “But what’s happening back home is so deadly it’s not going to be solved any time soon.”

On the Palestinian side, where there is often fierce opposition to any kind of “normalisation” with Israel or Israelis, most prefer not to give their full names. Adel, from southern Gaza, has not even told his family he is on the programme. “They wouldn’t understand. Maybe I will tell them – after the next war. Now I just feel more sorry for both peoples.”

Niztan, the Israeli who compered the farewell event, felt she had more in common with Palestinians – food and slang - than the Brits she encountered, she said during an earlier discussion. Bahaa, from Bethlehem, now a presenter with an Arabic TV channel in London, agreed. “It gave me chance to talk to the other, the enemy. We have more things in common than disliking English weather.”

The party was doubly poignant because the entire programme, not just another academic year, is now ending due to rising costs and increased calls on philanthropic giving. Work will continue on a research project on conflict resolution in general.

And it brought thoughtful reflections as well as expressions of gratitude to the conveners, Rosemary Hollis, a professor of politics, and Damian Gorman, a writer from Northern Ireland who applied some of the province’s lessons to the even harsher conditions of the holy land. Hollis talked about how hard it is to explain exactly what the programme has achieved. But she had a simple summary: “If you can get enemies to learn from each other – not to agree- that can be valuable.”

Gilad’s personal moment of truth came during the Israeli army’s Operation Cast Lead in Gaza in 2009, when he refused to report for reserve duty with his army unit, mobilised to put an end to Hamas rocket fire. “How could I take part in this butchery when the relatives of the people I know and call my friends are there on the other side?” he said. “This is the lasting effect of Olive Tree: it was a humanising project, one that continues to counter the ongoing dehumanisation of the other side that has proved so effective in recent years.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/on-the-middle-east/2016/jun/20/understanding-but-no-peace-for-palestinian-and-israeli-students-in-uk

Repost 0
Published by The Guardian.com (UK) - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
23 juin 2016 4 23 /06 /juin /2016 02:38

Essais nucléaires: Israël soutient l'interdiction mais sans signer le traité

Publié le 20 juin 2016 à 17h05

Jérusalem (AFP) - Israël "soutient" le Traité d'interdiction complète des essais nucléaires (TICE) mais n'est pas encore prêt à le ratifier, a affirmé lundi le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, près de 20 ans après l'adoption de ce pacte par l'ONU.
L'Etat hébreu, qui a signé le texte sans le ratifier, "soutient le traité et ses objectifs", a déclaré M. Netanyahu dans un communiqué après une rencontre avec Lassina Zerbo, secrétaire général de l'organisation du TICE, basée à Vienne . La question de la ratification dépend du contexte régional et du moment approprié", a-t-il ajouté.
Adopté par l'Assemblée générale de l'ONU en septembre 1996, ce traité a été signé par 183 pays mais doit encore être ratifié par huit Etats détenteurs de la technologie nucléaire (Chine, Etats-Unis, Inde, Pakistan, Corée du Nord, Egypte, Iran et Israël) pour entrer en vigueur.M. Zerbo a toutefois exprimé son optimisme quant à la ratification du traité par Israël, soulignant que M. Netanyahu lui avait assuré qu'il s'agissait d'une question de temps.
Les autorités israéliennes "travaillent actuellement pour déterminer ce moment", a déclaré M. Zerbo à l'AFP.
Israël n'a jamais admis officiellement posséder l'arme nucléaire mais selon l'Institut pour la science et la sécurité internationale basé aux Etats-Unis, il serait doté de 115 ogives nucléaires.
M. Netanyahu n'a par ailleurs de cesse de dénoncer les activités nucléaires iraniennes que Téhéran proclame pourtant entièrement civiles et qui ont donné lieu en 2015 à un accord international réprouvé par Israël.

http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/monde/20160620.AFP8975/essais-nucleaires-israel-soutient-l-interdiction-mais-sans-signer-le-traite.html

Repost 0
Published by Le Nouvel Observateur.com / AFP - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2016 3 22 /06 /juin /2016 02:40

Essais nucléaires: Israël soutient l'interdiction mais sans signer le traité

Publié le 20 juin 2016 à 17h05

Jérusalem (AFP) - Israël "soutient" le Traité d'interdiction complète des essais nucléaires (TICE) mais n'est pas encore prêt à le ratifier, a affirmé lundi le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, près de 20 ans après l'adoption de ce pacte par l'ONU.

L'Etat hébreu, qui a signé le texte sans le ratifier, "soutient le traité et ses objectifs", a déclaré M. Netanyahu dans un communiqué après une rencontre avec Lassina Zerbo, secrétaire général de l'organisation du TICE, basée à Vienne . La question de la ratification dépend du contexte régional et du moment approprié", a-t-il ajouté.

Adopté par l'Assemblée générale de l'ONU en septembre 1996, ce traité a été signé par 183 pays mais doit encore être ratifié par huit Etats détenteurs de la technologie nucléaire (Chine, Etats-Unis, Inde, Pakistan, Corée du Nord, Egypte, Iran et Israël) pour entrer en vigueur.M. Zerbo a toutefois exprimé son optimisme quant à la ratification du traité par Israël, soulignant que M. Netanyahu lui avait assuré qu'il s'agissait d'une question de temps.

Les autorités israéliennes "travaillent actuellement pour déterminer ce moment", a déclaré M. Zerbo à l'AFP.

Israël n'a jamais admis officiellement posséder l'arme nucléaire mais selon l'Institut pour la science et la sécurité internationale basé aux Etats-Unis, il serait doté de 115 ogives nucléaires.

M. Netanyahu n'a par ailleurs de cesse de dénoncer les activités nucléaires iraniennes que Téhéran proclame pourtant entièrement civiles et qui ont donné lieu en 2015 à un accord international réprouvé par Israël.

http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/monde/20160620.AFP8975/essais-nucleaires-israel-soutient-l-interdiction-mais-sans-signer-le-traite.html

Repost 0
Published by Le Nouvel Observateur.com / AFP - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article
22 juin 2016 3 22 /06 /juin /2016 02:38

Israël : Appels à la paix

Après un attentat palestinien en Israël, on a plus souvent l’habitude d’entendre des appels à la vengeance.

Après un attentat palestinien en Israël, on a plus souvent l’habitude d’entendre des appels à la vengeance contre « les Arabes ». Le discours d’un père de l’une des victimes de la fusillade du 8 juin n’en est que plus remarquable. Devant plusieurs centaines de personnes venues assister aux funérailles de son fils, le père d’Ido Ben Ari, un des quatre Israéliens tués dans un quartier animé de Tel-Aviv, a reproché au gouvernement israélien de ne pas tout faire pour trouver un accord avec les Palestiniens.

LIRE >> Israël : Attentat et punition collective.

« Les dirigeants que nous élisons démocratiquement sont censés trouver une solution stratégique au conflit, ce qui exige une grande capacité de vision, de concessions, de solutions créatives, et pas des grandes phrases vides de sens », a-t-il ainsi déclaré.

Un discours qui n’est pas sans rappeler celui tenu par le maire de Tel-Aviv, Ron Huldai, au lendemain de la fusillade. Il avait vivement condamné l’occupation de territoires palestiniens et la frilosité du régime à trouver un accord : « Nous sommes peut-être le seul pays au monde où un autre peuple se trouve sous notre occupation. […] Un changement ne peut intervenir que si nous montrons à nos voisins palestiniens que nous avons de véritables intentions de changer la situation actuelle. »

Des propos forts tenus seulement quelques jours après la conférence de Paris pour relancer le processus de paix au Proche-Orient, qualifié de « diktat international » par le Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin ­Netanyahou.

http://www.politis.fr/articles/2016/06/israel-appels-a-la-paix-34918/

Repost 0
Published by Politis.fr - dans Revue de presse
commenter cet article